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Listed 5 sub titles with search on: The inhabitants for destination: "PAGGAIO Mountain KAVALA".


The inhabitants (5)

Ancient tribes

Odonianti

Odonianti, a Thracian or Paeonian tribe inhabiting the range of Pangaeum (if the reading be right): Hdt. 5.16, Hdt. 7.112


Satrae

Satrae SATRAE (Satrai, Herod. vii. 110--112), a Thracian people who occupied a portion of the range of the Pangaeus,between the Nestus and the Strymon. Herodotus states that they were the only Thracian tribe who had always preserved their freedom; a fact for which he accounts by the nature of their country,--a mountainous region, covered with forests and snow--and by their great bravery. They alone of the Thracians did not follow in the train of Xerxes, when marching towards Greece. The Satrae were in possession of an oracle of Dionysus, situated among the loftiest mountain peaks, and the interpreters of which were taken from among the Bessi,--a circumstance which has suggested the conjecture that the Satrae were merely a clan of the Bessi,--a notion which is rendered more probable by the fact Republic. that Herodotus is the only ancient writer who mentions them; whereas the Bessi are repeatedly spoken of. We may infer from Pliny's expression, Bessorum multa nomina (iv. 11. s. 18), that the Bessi were divided into many distinct clans. Herodotus says that to the Satrae belonged the principal part of the gold and silver mines which then existed in the Pangaeus.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited July 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Sapei

  Sapei (Sapaioi or Sapaioi), a Thracian people, occupying the southern portion of the Pangaeus, in the neighbourhood of Abdera. (Strab. xii. p. 549.) In this passage, however, Strabo calls them Sapae (Sapai), and assumes their identity with the Sinti, which in another place (x. p. 457) he treats as a mere matter of conjecture. The Via Egnatia ran through their country, and especially through a narrow and difficult defile called by Appian (B.C. iv. 87, 106) the pass of the Sapaei, and stated by him to be 18 miles from Philippi; so that it must have been nearly midway between Neapolis and Abdera. The Sapaei are mentioned, and merely mentioned, by Herodotus (vii. 110) and by Pliny (iv. 11. s. 18). Their town is called Sapaica (Sapaike) by Steph. B. (s. v.).

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Satrae

  Satrae (Satrai, Herod. vii. 110-112), a Thracian people who occupied a portion of the range of the Pangaeus, between the Nestus and the Strymon. Herodotus states that they were the only Thracian tribe who had always preserved their freedom; a fact for which he accounts by the nature of their country, -a mountainous region, covered with forests and snow- and by their great bravery. They alone of the Thracians did not follow in the train of Xerxes, when marching towards Greece. The Satrae were in possession of an oracle of Dionysus, situated among the loftiest mountain peaks, and the interpreters of which were taken from among the Bessi, -a circumstance which has suggested the conjecture that the Satrae were merely a clan of the Bessi, -a notion which is rendered more probable by the fact Republic. that Herodotus is the only ancient writer who mentions them; whereas the Bessi are repeatedly spoken of. We may infer from Pliny's expression, Bessorum multa nomina (iv. 11. s. 18), that the Bessi were divided into many distinct clans. Herodotus says that to the Satrae belonged the principal part of the gold and silver mines which then existed in the Pangaeus.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Remarkable selections

Orescii

  Orescii (Orrheskioi), a people of Macedonia or Thrace, known only from their coins. These have been by some writers referred to the Orestae; but it is more probable, as suggested by Leake, that they were one of the Thracian tribes who worked the silver mines of Pangaeum; a circumstance which will account for our finding silver coins of large size and in considerable numbers struck by a people so obscure that their name is not mentioned by any ancient author (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. p. 213, Numismata Hellenica, p. 81.) The coins in question) one of which is annexed, closely resemble in style and fabric those of, the Bisaltae and Edoni in the same neighbourhood.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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