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Listed 91 sub titles with search on: The inhabitants for wider area of: "TURKEY Country EUROPE" .


The inhabitants (91)

Ancient authors' reports

ANTANDROS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Pelasgian city of Antandrus

(Hdt. 7.42.1)


KARIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Leleges

As for the Leleges, some conjecture that they are the same as the Carians, and others that they were only fellow inhabitants and fellow soldiers of these; and this, they say, is why, in the territory of Miletus, certain settlements are called settlements of the Leleges, and why, in many places in Caria, tombs of the Leleges and deserted forts, known as Lelegian forts, are so called.


Leleges


Ionians

(Ionians) after the return of the Heracleidae they were driven out by the Achaeans and went back again to Athens; and from there they sent forth with the Codridae the Ionian colony to Asia, and these founded twelve cities on the seaboard of Caria and Lydia, thus dividing themselves into the same number of parts as the cities they had occupied in the Peloponnesus.


Ancient tribes

ALIKARNASSOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Dorians

The Rhodians, like the people of Halicarnassus and Cnidus and Cos, are Dorians; for of the Dorians who founded Megara after the death of Codrus, some remained there, others took part with Althaemenes the Argive in the colonization of Crete, and others were distributed to Rhodes and to the cities just now mentioned. But these events are later than those mentioned by Homer, for Cnidus and Halicarnassus were not yet in existence, although Rhodes and Cos were; but they were inhabited by Heracleidae.

This extract is from: The Geography of Strabo (ed. H. L. Jones, 1924), Cambridge. Harvard University Press. Cited July 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


EFESSOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ioinians

Now these Ionians possessed the Panionion, and of all men whom we know, they happened to found their cities in places with the loveliest of climate and seasons. For neither to the north of them nor to the south does the land effect the same thing as in Ionia [nor to the east nor to the west], affected here by the cold and wet, there by the heat and drought. They do not all have the same speech but four different dialects. Miletus lies farthest south among them, and next to it come Myus and Priene; these are settlements in Caria, and they have a common language; Ephesus, Colophon, Lebedos, Teos, Clazomenae, Phocaea, all of them in Lydia, have a language in common which is wholly different from the speech of the three former cities.

This extract is from: Herodotus. The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley, 1920), Cambridge. Harvard University Press. Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Mysomakedones

Mysomakedones (Musomakedones), a tribe of the Mysians, probably occupying the district about the sources of the small river Mysius. (Ptol. v. 2. § 15; Plin. v. 31.) In the time of the Romans this tribe belonged to the conventus of Ephesus; but further particulars are not known of them.


ENOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Apsinthi

Apsinthii or Apsynthii (Apsinthioi, Apsunthioi), a people of Thrace, bordering on the Thracian Chersonesus. (Herod. vi. 34, ix. 119.) The city of Aenus was also called Apsynthus (Steph. B. s. vv. Ainos, Apsunthos); and Dionysius Periegetes (577) speaks of a river of the same name.


ERYTHRES (Ancient city) TURKEY

Lycians

Named after Lycus, come from Crete, army of, restores Proetus to Argolis, lay an ambush for Bellerophon, at war with Cilix, Trojan allies, their kings of Ionia, their resistance to the Medes, tribute to Persia, in Xerxes' army.


Carians

Islanders originally, the chief people in the Minoan empire, friends of Minos.


Ionians

There are yet three Ionian cities, two of them situated on the islands of Samos and Chios, and one, Erythrae, on the mainland; the Chians and Erythraeans speak alike


FASILIS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Dorians

The Dorian cities of Rhodes, Cnidus, Halicarnassus, and Phaselis


FOKEA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ionians

The greatest and most famous and most visited precinct is that which is called the Hellenion, founded jointly by the Ionian cities of Chios, Teos, Phocaea, and Clazomenae, the Dorian cities of Rhodes, Cnidus, Halicarnassus, and Phaselis, and one Aeolian city, Mytilene.


GALATIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Trokmones

They lived in a place of the country which cpital was Tavitha.


Tektosages

They lived in a place of the country which capital was Agyra.


Tolistovies

They lived in a place of the country which capital was Pessinounta.


KERASSOUS (Ancient city) PONTOS

Mosynoeci

  Mosynoeci, Mossynoeci, Mosyni, Mossyni (Mosunoikoi, Mossunoikoi, mossunoi, Mossunoi), a tribe on the coast of Pontus, occupying the district between the Tibareni and Macrones, and containing the towns of Cerasus and Pharnacia. The Mosynoeci were a brave and warlike people, but are at the same time said to have been the rudest and most uncivilised among all the tribes of Asia Minor. Many of their peculiar customs are noticed by the Greeks, who planted colonies in their districts. They are said to have lived on trees and in towers. (Strab. xii. p. 549.) Their kings, it is said, were elected by the people, and dwelt in an isolated tower rising somewhat above the houses of his subjects, who watched his proceedings closely, and provided him with all that was necessary; but when he did anything that displeased them, they stopped their supplies, and left him to die of starvation. (Xen. Anab. v. 4. 26; Apollon. Rhod. ii. 1027; Diod. xiv. 30; Scymnus, Fragm. 166.) They used to cut off the heads of the enemies they had slain, and carry them about amid dances and songs. (Xen. Anab. iv. 4. 17; v. 40 § 15.) It is also related that they knew nothing of marriage (Xen. Anab. v. 4. 33; Diod. l. c.), and that they generally tattooed their bodies. Eating and drinking was their greatest happiness, whence the children of the wealthy among them were regularly fattened with salt dolphins and chestnuts, until they were as thick as they were tall (Xen. Anab. v. 4. 32). Their arms consisted of heavy spears, six cubits in length, with round or globular handles; large shields of wicker-work covered with ox-hides ; and leather or wooden helmets, the top of which was adorned with a crest of hair. (Xen. l. c., v. 4. § 12 ; Herod. vii. 78.) The fourth chapter of the fifth book of Xenophon's Anabasis is full of curious information about this singular people. (Comp. also Strab. xi. p. 528; Hecat. Fragm. 193; Steph. B. s. v.; Herod. iii. 94; Scylax, p. 33.; Amm. Marc. xxii. 8 ; Orph. Argon. 740; Mela, i. 19; Tibull. iv. 1. 146; Curtius, vi. 4, 17; Plin. vi. 4; Val. Flacc. v. 152; Dionys. Per. 766.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


KILIKIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Clitae

  Clitae, a Cilician people who are mentioned by Tacitus (Ann. vi. 41) as subjects of a Cappadocian Archelaus, in the time of Tiberius. This Archelaus appears to have been a king of, Cilicia Trachea, certainly not the last king of Cappadocia, for he was dead before the time to which Tacitus refers in the passage cited above. The Clitae refused to submit to the regulations of the Roman census, and to pay taxes, and retired to the heights of Taurus. There they successfully resisted the king, until M. Trebellius was sent by Vitellius, the governor of Syria, who blockaded them in their hill forts, Cadra and Davara, and compelled them to surrender. In the reign of Claudius the Clitae again fortified themselves on the mountains, under a leader Trosobores, whence they descended to the coast and the towns, plundering the cultivators, townspeople, shipmasters, and merchants. They besieged the town of Anemurium, a place probably near the promontory, from which and the other circumstances we collect that the Clitae were a nation in Cilicia Trachea. At last Antiochus, who was king of this coast, by pleasing the common sort and cajoling the leader, succeeded in putting Trosobores and a few of the chiefs to death, and pacified the rest by his mild measures. (Tac. Ann. xii. 55.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


KIOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Bebryces

  Bebryces (Bebrukes, their country Bebrukia). A nation on the Pontus in Asia. Stephanus (s. v. Busnaioi) also mentions the Bysnaei as a tribe of Bebryces. Strabo (p. 295) supposes the Bebryces to have been of Thracian stock, and that their first place of settlement in Asia was Mysia. Dionysius Periegetes (805; and see the commentary of Eustathius) places the Bebryces where the river Cius enters the Propontus, that is, about the Gulf of Cius. Eratosthenes (Plin. v. 30) enumerates the Bebryces among the Asiatic nations that had perished. In fact, the Bebryces belong to mythology rather than to history.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


KLAZOMENES (Ancient city) TURKEY

Cleonaeans and Phliasians

Settle at Clazomenae.


Ionians

The greatest and most famous and most visited precinct is that which is called the Hellenion, founded jointly by the Ionian cities of Chios, Teos, Phocaea, and Clazomenae, the Dorian cities of Rhodes, Cnidus, Halicarnassus, and Phaselis, and one Aeolian city, Mytilene.


KNIDOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Dorians

The Rhodians, like the people of Halicarnassus and Cnidus and Cos, are Dorians; for of the Dorians who founded Megara after the death of Codrus, some remained there, others took part with Althaemenes the Argive in the colonization of Crete, and others were distributed to Rhodes and to the cities just now mentioned. But these events are later than those mentioned by Homer, for Cnidus and Halicarnassus were not yet in existence, although Rhodes and Cos were; but they were inhabited by Heracleidae.


KOLOFON (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ioinians

Now these Ionians possessed the Panionion, and of all men whom we know, they happened to found their cities in places with the loveliest of climate and seasons. For neither to the north of them nor to the south does the land effect the same thing as in Ionia [nor to the east nor to the west], affected here by the cold and wet, there by the heat and drought. They do not all have the same speech but four different dialects. Miletus lies farthest south among them, and next to it come Myus and Priene; these are settlements in Caria, and they have a common language; Ephesus, Colophon, Lebedos, Teos, Clazomenae, Phocaea, all of them in Lydia, have a language in common which is wholly different from the speech of the three former cities.


KYZIKOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Doliones

Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer): book 1, chapter 9, section 18


Dolionis

  Dolionis (Dolionis: Eth. Doliones). Stephanus B. (s. v. Doliones) describes the Doliones as the inhabitants of Cyzicus, and he adds that Hecataeus called them Dolieis: they were also called Dolionii.
  The Doliones (Strab. p. 575) are, a people about Cyzicus who extended from the river Aesepus to the Rhyndacus and the lake Dascylitis. The names Dolionis and Doliones are connected with the earliest traditions about Cyzicus; and in Strabo's time the Cyziceni had the Dolionis. Strabo found it hard to fix the limits of the Bithynians, the Mysians, the Phrygians, as well as of the Doliones, those about Cyzicus; and we cannot do more than he did. Apollonius Rhodius (Arg. i. 947) doubtless followed an old tradition when he described the Doliones as occupying the isthmus, by which he means the isthmus of Cyzicus, and the plain, which is probably the plain on the mainland; and here, he says, reigned Cyzicus, a son of Aeneas.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


LEVEDOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ioinians

Now these Ionians possessed the Panionion, and of all men whom we know, they happened to found their cities in places with the loveliest of climate and seasons. For neither to the north of them nor to the south does the land effect the same thing as in Ionia [nor to the east nor to the west], affected here by the cold and wet, there by the heat and drought. They do not all have the same speech but four different dialects. Miletus lies farthest south among them, and next to it come Myus and Priene; these are settlements in Caria, and they have a common language; Ephesus, Colophon, Lebedos, Teos, Clazomenae, Phocaea, all of them in Lydia, have a language in common which is wholly different from the speech of the three former cities.


MILITOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ioinians

Now these Ionians possessed the Panionion, and of all men whom we know, they happened to found their cities in places with the loveliest of climate and seasons. For neither to the north of them nor to the south does the land effect the same thing as in Ionia [nor to the east nor to the west], affected here by the cold and wet, there by the heat and drought. They do not all have the same speech but four different dialects. Miletus lies farthest south among them, and next to it come Myus and Priene; these are settlements in Caria, and they have a common language; Ephesus, Colophon, Lebedos, Teos, Clazomenae, Phocaea, all of them in Lydia, have a language in common which is wholly different from the speech of the three former cities.


Carians

Pherecydes says concerning this seaboard that Miletus and Myus and the parts round Mycale and Ephesus were in earlier times occupied by Carians, and that the coast next thereafter, as far as Phocaea and Chios and Samos, which were ruled by Ancaeus, was occupied by Leleges, but that both were driven out by the Ionians and took refuge in the remaining parts of Caria.


MYKALI (Cape) TURKEY

Carians & Ionians

Pherecydes says concerning this seaboard that Miletus and Myus and the parts round Mycale and Ephesus were in earlier times occupied by Carians, and that the coast next thereafter, as far as Phocaea and Chios and Samos, which were ruled by Ancaeus, was occupied by Leleges, but that both were driven out by the Ionians and took refuge in the remaining parts of Caria.


MYOUS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ioinians

Now these Ionians possessed the Panionion, and of all men whom we know, they happened to found their cities in places with the loveliest of climate and seasons. For neither to the north of them nor to the south does the land effect the same thing as in Ionia [nor to the east nor to the west], affected here by the cold and wet, there by the heat and drought. They do not all have the same speech but four different dialects. Miletus lies farthest south among them, and next to it come Myus and Priene; these are settlements in Caria, and they have a common language; Ephesus, Colophon, Lebedos, Teos, Clazomenae, Phocaea, all of them in Lydia, have a language in common which is wholly different from the speech of the three former cities.


Carians

Pherecydes says concerning this seaboard that Miletus and Myus and the parts round Mycale and Ephesus were in earlier times occupied by Carians, and that the coast next thereafter, as far as Phocaea and Chios and Samos, which were ruled by Ancaeus, was occupied by Leleges, but that both were driven out by the Ionians and took refuge in the remaining parts of Caria.


MYSIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Mysomacedones

(Musomakedones), a tribe of the Mysians, probably occupying the district about the sources of the small river Mysius. (Ptol. v. 2. § 15; Plin. v. 31.) In the time of the Romans this tribe belonged to the conventus of Ephesus; but further particulars are not known of them.


PONTOS (Ancient country) TURKEY

Tivaryni, Mossyniki, Makrones, Vachires

In the coastline of Pontos from W to E.


Chalyves, Sanni, Saspires


Becheires

  Becheires (Becheires, Becheiroi), a barbarous tribe on the coast of the Pontus (Apoll. Rhod. ii. 396, 1246; Dionys. Perieg. 765), mentioned with the Macrones, and as east of the Macrones. Scylax, following the coast from east to west, names the Becheires, and then the Macrocephali, supposed by Cramer to be the Macrones; but Pliny (vi. 3) distinguishes the Macrones and Macrocephali. Pliny's enumeration of names often rather confuses than helps us; and it is difficult to say where he places the Becheires. But we might infer from Pliny and Mela (i. 19) that they were west of Trapezus, and east of the Thermodon.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited October 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Macrones

  Macrones (Makrones), a powerful tribe in the east of Pontus, about the Moschici mountains. They are described as wearing garments made of hair, and as using in war wooden helmets, small shields of wicker-work, and short lances with long points. (Herod. ii. 104, vii. 78; Xenoph. Anab. iv. 8. § 3, v. 5. § 18, vii. 8. § 25; comp. Hecat. Fragm. 191; Scylax, p. 33; Dionys. Perieg. 766; Apollon. Rhod. ii. 22; Plin. vi. 4; Joseph. c. Apion. i. § 22, who asserts that they observed the custom of circumcision.) Strabo (xii. p. 548) remarks, in passing, that the people formerly called Macrones bore in his day the name of Sanni, though Pliny (l. c.) speaks of the Sanni and Macrones as two distinct peoples. They appear to have always been a rude and wild tribe, until civilisation and Christianity were introduced among them in the reign of Justinian. (Procop. Bell. Pers. i. 15, Bell. Goth. iv. 2, de Aed. iii. 6.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Mares

Mares, a tribe on the coast of Pontus, in the neighbourhood of the Mosynoeci. (Hecat. Fragm. 192; Herod. iii. 94.) Their armour, when serving in the army of Xerxes, is described by Herodotus (vii. 79) as having consisted of helmets of wicker-work, leather shields, and javelins. Later writers do not mention this tribe.


Coraxi

  Coraxi (Koraxoi, Aristot. Meteor. i. 13; Hecat. Fragm. 185; Steph. B. s. v.; Mela, i. 19, iii. 5; Scylax) p. 31; Plin. vi. 5. s. 5), a tribe of Pontus to the NW. of Colchis, and close to the outlying spurs of the Caucasus. They probably occupied the western bank of the Corax in the neighbourhood of Dioscurias. In the same district, according to Stephanus, was Coraxicus Murus and Coraxica Regio.


PRIINI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ioinians

Now these Ionians possessed the Panionion, and of all men whom we know, they happened to found their cities in places with the loveliest of climate and seasons. For neither to the north of them nor to the south does the land effect the same thing as in Ionia [nor to the east nor to the west], affected here by the cold and wet, there by the heat and drought. They do not all have the same speech but four different dialects. Miletus lies farthest south among them, and next to it come Myus and Priene; these are settlements in Caria, and they have a common language; Ephesus, Colophon, Lebedos, Teos, Clazomenae, Phocaea, all of them in Lydia, have a language in common which is wholly different from the speech of the three former cities.


TEOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ionians

The greatest and most famous and most visited precinct is that which is called the Hellenion, founded jointly by the Ionian cities of Chios, Teos, Phocaea, and Clazomenae, the Dorian cities of Rhodes, Cnidus, Halicarnassus, and Phaselis, and one Aeolian city, Mytilene.


TROAS (Ancient country) TURKEY

Cilices

  Cilices (Kilikes), they are mentioned in the Iliad as the inhabitants of the part of Mysia called Troas. Eetion, the father of Andromache, Hector's wife, lived beneath wooded Placos; and his chief city was Thebe Hypoplacie. (Il. vi. 395, 415.) He was king of the Cilices. Strabo observes that Homer makes Pelasgi border on these Cilices, for he mentions Larissa as one of the cities of the Pelasgi (Il. ii. 840). In another passage (pp. 586, 611) he divides the territory of these Cilices into two parts, one the Thebaice, and the other Lyrnessis; and he makes the territory of the Cilices comprehend the territories of Adramyttium, Atarneus, and Pitane, and extend to the mouth of the Caicus. It seems to have been the opinion of some of the Greek critics that the Cilices of Homer were akin to the other Cilices; for Strabo observes, they say that in the tract between Phaselis in Lycia and Attalia there are pointed out a Thebe and Lyrnessus, a part of the Troic Cilices who were ejected from the plain of Thebe having gone to Pamphylia, as Callisthenes has said. Whether Callisthenes stated the emigration of these Cilicians and the existence of these cities as a fact, or as report, seems somewhat doubtful. The passage, perhaps, means that there was a story that ruins were pointed out in these parts, which had the names of Thebe and Lyrnessus. But it was a disputed question which of the two Cilices were the parent stock; for while some pointed to places in Cilicia as evidence of an emigration of Cilicians from the Troad, as in Pamphylia they referred to a Thebe and Lyrnessus, others turned the argument the other way, and referred to an Aleian plain also in the Troad. The discussion in Strabo is not very profitable reading. There was, however, a tradition that these Troic Cilicians drove the Syri from the country afterwards called Cilicia. There is no doubt that Cilicia was once occupied by an Aramaic race, but it cannot be determined whether the Cilices of Cilicia in the historical period derived their name from some Cilices who invaded their country from the west, or whether it was the name of the earliest known inhabitants of the country.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


VISII (Ancient city) TURKEY

Odrysae, Odrysians


Odrysae


VITHYNIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Mysians, Bebryces

The original inhabitants of Bithynia, which was also called Bebrycia, from Bebryce, a daughter of Danaus.


The Bebryces were submitted to the Bithynians, a Thracian tribe, who conquered their land.


Thyni

They were a Thracian tribe that conquered the country.


Mariandyni

They lived to the NE of the country and were not submitted to the Bithynians, when they conquered the country.


  Mariandyni (Mariandunoi, Mariandenoi, or Maruandunoi), an ancient and celebrated tribe in the north-east of Bithynia, between the rivers Sangarius and Billaeus, on the east of the tribe called Thyni or Bithyni. (Scylax, p. 34; Plin. vi. 1.) According to Scylax, they did not extend as far west as the Sangarius, for according to him the river Hypius formed the boundary between the Bithyni and Mariandyni. Strabo (vii. p. 295) expresses a belief that the Mariandyni were a branch of the Bithynians, a belief to which he was probably led by the resemblance between their names, and which cannot be well reconciled with the statement of Herodotus (iii. 90), who clearly distinguishes the Mariandyni from the Thracians or Thyni in Asia. In the Persian army, also, they appear quite separated from the Bithyni, and their armour resembles that of the Paphlagonians, which was quite different from that of the Bithyni. (Herod. vii. 72, 75; comp. Strab. vii. p. 345, xii. p. 542.) The chief city in their territory was Heraclea Pontica, the inhabitants of which reduced the Mariandyni, for a time, to a state of servitude resembling that of the Cretan Mnoae, or the Thessalian Penestae. To what race they belonged is uncertain, though if their Thracian origin be given up, it must probably be admitted that they were akin to the Paphlagonians. In the division of the Persian empire they formed part of the third Persian satrapy. Their country was called Mariandynia (Mariandunia, Steph. B. s. v.), and Pliny speaks of a Sinus Mariandynus on their coast. (Comp. Hecat. Fragm. 201; Aeschyl. Pers. 932; Xen. Anab. vi, 4. § 4, Cyrop. i. 1. § 4; Ptol. v. 1. § 11; Scymn. Fragm. 199; Dionys. Perieg. 788; Mela, i. 19; Athen. xiv. p. 620; Apollon. Argon. ii. 724; Constant. Porph. Them. i. 7.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


First inhabitants

EFESSOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Carians & Leleges

It is stated that the city was built by the Amazones and was inhabited by the Carians and the Leleges until the arrival of the Ionians, who came from Attica under the leadership of Androclus, the son of Codrus, and the city became the capital of Ionia.


Carians

Pherecydes says concerning this seaboard that Miletus and Myus and the parts round Mycale and Ephesus were in earlier times occupied by Carians, and that the coast next thereafter, as far as Phocaea and Chios and Samos, which were ruled by Ancaeus, was occupied by Leleges, but that both were driven out by the Ionians and took refuge in the remaining parts of Caria.


FOKEA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Leleges

Pherecydes says concerning this seaboard that Miletus and Myus and the parts round Mycale and Ephesus were in earlier times occupied by Carians, and that the coast next thereafter, as far as Phocaea and Chios and Samos, which were ruled by Ancaeus, was occupied by Leleges, but that both were driven out by the Ionians and took refuge in the remaining parts of Caria.


LYKIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Milyans


PLAKIA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Pelasgians


Inhabitants' origin

Magnetans are descendants of Delphians

The Magnetans are thought to be descendants of Delphians who settled in the Didyman hills, in Thessaly .. Here was also the temple of Dindymene, Mother of the gods. According to tradition, the wife of Themistocles, some say his daughter, served as a priestess there. But the temple is not now in existence, because the city has been transferred to another site.


Local proverbs

KOLOFON (Ancient city) TURKEY

He put Colophon to it

The Colophonians once possessed notable naval and cavalry forces, in which latter they were so far superior to the others that wherever in wars that were hard to bring to an end, the cavalry of the Colophonians served as ally, the war came to an end; whence arose the proverb, "he put Colophon to it," which is quoted when a sure end is put to any affair.


SOLI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Solikismi


TEOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Well then, the Corycaean was listening to this

The waters along the coast of Mt. Corycus, they say, were everywhere the haunt of pirates, the Corycaeans, as they are called, who had found a new way of attacking vessels; for, they say, the Corycaeans would scatter themselves among the harbors, follow up the merchants whose vessels lay at anchor in them, and overhear what cargoes they had aboard and whither they were bound, and then come together and attack the merchants after they had put to sea and plunder their vessels; and hence it is that we call every person who is a busybody and tries to overhear private and secret conversations a Corycaean; and that we say in a proverb: ‘Well then, the Corycaean was listening to this,’ when one thinks that he is doing or saying something in secret, but fails to keep it hidden because of persons who spy on him and are eager to learn what does not concern them.


Names of the inhabitants

ALYVI (Ancient city) ALIZONES

Halizones

A people of Bithynia, with a capital city Alybe (Il. ii. 856).


EOLIS (Ancient country) TURKEY

Aeoles

Aeoles or Aeolii. One of the chief branches of the Hellenic race, and supposed to be descended from Aeolus, son of Hellen. They originally lived in Thessaly, subsequently spread over various parts of Greece, and also settled in Aeolis in Asia Minor, and in Lesbos


ERYTHRES (Ancient city) TURKEY

Erythraeans

Perseus Project Index. Total results on 30/5/2001: 25 for Erythraeans.


FOKEA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Phocians

Join Ionian emigration to Asia.


GALATIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Gauls, Celts

Country of, formerly called Celts, defeat Ptolemy Thunderbolt, invade Greece, their cavalry, Gauls at Thermopylae, at war with Aetolians, attack Delphi but are repulsed, cross to Asia, ravage Ionia, defeated in Mysia by Attalus I., king of Pergamus, repulsed from Celaenae in Phrygia, occupy Galatia, mercenary Gauls plot to seize Egypt, but are put to death, Gallic mercenaries of Antigonus defeated by Pyrrhus.


KAPADOKIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Leucosyri

  Leucosyri (Leukosnroi), the ancient name of the Syrians inhabiting Cappadocia, by which they were distinguished from the more southern Syrians, who were of a darker complexion. (Herod. i. 72, vii. 72; Strab. xvi. p. 737; Plin. H. N. vi. 3; Eustath. ad Dionys. 772, 970.) They also spread over the western parts of Pontus, between the rivers Iris and Halys. In the time of Xenophon (Anab. v. 6. § 8, &c.) they were united with Paphlagonia, and governed by a Paphlagonian prince, who is said to have had an army of 120,000 men, mostly horsemen. This name was often used by the Greeks, even at the time when it had become customary to designate all the inhabitants of the country by their native, or rather Persian name, Cappadoces ; but it was applied more particularly to the inhabitants of the coast district on the Euxine, between the rivers Halys and Iris. (Hecat. Fragm. 194, 200,. 350; Marcian. Heracl. p. 72.) Ptolemy (v. 6. § 2) also applies the name exclusively to the inhabitants about the Iris, and treats of their country as a part of the province of Cappadocia. The Leucosyri were regarded as colonists, who had been planted there during the early conquests of the Assyrians, and were successively subject to Lydia, Persia, and Macedonia; but after the time of Alexander their name is scarcely mentioned, the people having become entirely amalgamated with the nations among which they lived.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


KARIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Carians

Islanders originally, the chief people in the Minoan empire, friends of Minos, former inhabitants of Miletus, and of Myus and Priene, their inventions of armour, attacked by the Persians, subdued, Carian settlers in Egypt, Apries' Carian guard, Carian tribute to Persia, a Carian warrior in the Cyprian revolt, Carian revolt against Darius, subdued, Carians in Xerxes' fleet, Carian language not understood by Greeks, so-called "Ionian" dress really Carian, Trojan allies, driven from Clarus by Thebans, and from Lebedus by Ionians, settle in Chios.


KNIDOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Cnidians

Honour Aphrodite above all gods, attempt to cut through their isthmus, colonise Liparaean islands, their offerings at Delphi, treasury at Delphi, dedicate Clubroom (Lesche) at Delphi.


Cnidians

Perseus Project Index. Total results on 6/6/2001: 31 for Cnidians, 13 for Knidians.


KOLOFON (Ancient city) TURKEY

Colophonians

Sacrifice black female puppy to Wayside Goddess, dedicate statue at Olympia.


Colophonians

Perseus Project Index. Total results on 18/5/2001: 23 for Colophonians, 2 for Kolophonians.


KYMI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Cymaeans

Perseus Project Index. Total results on 30/5/2001: 20 for Cymaeans, 1 for Kymaians.


KYZIKOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

LYDIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Termilae

Termilae (Termilai) is said to have been the ancient name of the inhabitants of Lydia, before the name Lydi came into use. These Termilae were believed to have come from Crete; and even in the time of Herodotus the Lydians were often called Termilae by the neighbouring nations. (Herod. i. 173, vii. 92; Paus. i. 19. § 4.)


LYKIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Lycians

Named after Lycus, come from Crete, army of, restores Proetus to Argolis, lay an ambush for Bellerophon, at war with Cilix, Trojan allies, their kings of Ionia, their resistance to the Medes, tribute to Persia, in Xerxes' army.


MYOUS (Ancient city) TURKEY

PAMFYLIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Pamphylians

Perseus Encyclopedia.Total results on 21/5/2001: 27 for Pamphylians.


TEOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

TROY (Ancient city) TURKEY

Trojans

Also called Teucrians, their denial of the possession of Helen, Paeonians, and Gergithes, descended from them; Teucrian invasion of Europe before the Trojan war, refuse to restore Helen, besieged by the Greeks, joined by allies, chase the Greeks within their wall, flee before Patroclus, chased by Achilles, judge in the competition for the arms of Achilles, many slain by Neoptolemus, drag the Wooden Horse into Troy, slain by the Greeks, people of Tenea claim to be Trojans.


Trojans

Perseus Project Index. Total results on 7/5/2001: 1000 for Trojans, 48 for Teucrians.


VITHYNIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Strymonii

Strymonii (Strumonioi), the name by which, according to tradition, the Bithynians in Asia originally were called, because they had immigrated into Asia from the country about the Strymon in Europe. (Herod. vii. 75; Steph. B. s. v. Strumon.) Pliny (v. 40) further states that Bithynia was called by some Strymonis.


Worships of the inhabitants

EFESSOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Evangelus

Evangelus, (Euangelos), the bearer of good news. Under this name the shepherd Pixodarus had a sanctuary at Ephesus, where he enjoyed heroic honours, because he had found a quarry of beautiful marble, of which the Ephesians built a temple. (Vitruv. x. 7.)


FOKEA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Gennaides

Goddesses at Phocaea.


FRYGIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Berecynthia

Berecynthia (Berekunthia), a surname of Cybele, which she derived either from mount Berecynthus, or from a fortified place of that name in Phrygia, where she was particularly worshipped. Mount Berecynthus again derived its name from Berecynthus, a priest of Cybele. (Callim. Hymn. in Dian. 246; Serv. ad Aen. ix. 82, vi. 785; Strab. x.; Plut. de Flum. 10.)


HERAKLIA OF PONTOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Idmon, the seer

Idmon. The son of Apollo and of Asterie, daughter of Coronus; a seer who took part in the Argonautic expedition, although he foresaw that it would lead to his own death. He was killed by a wild boar in the land of the Mariandyni, in Bithynia, and was worshipped as a hero by the inhabitants of the town of Heraclea in Pontus, which was built around his grave by command of Apollo.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


KEDRIES (Ancient city) TURKEY

Athena


Dioscuri


TRALLIS (Ancient city) TURKEY

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