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Listed 6 sub titles with search on: Biographies for destination: "LARISSA Ancient city THESSALIA".


Biographies (6)

Philosophers

Anaxilaus. 1st c. B.C.

Anaxilaus (Anaxilaos), a physician and Pythagorean philosopher, was born at Larissa, but at which city of that name is not certain. He was banished by the Emperor Augustus from Rome and Italy, B. C. 28, on account of his being accused of being a magician (Euseb. Chron. ad Olymp. clxxxviii.), which charge, it appears, originated in his possessing superior skill in natural philosophy, and thus performing by natural means certain wonderful things, which by the ignorant and credulous were ascribed to magic. These tricks are mentioned by St. Irenaeus (i. 13.1) and St. Epiphanius (Adv. Haeres.), and several specimens are given by Pliny (H. N. xix. 4, xxv. 95, xxviii. 49, xxxii. 52, xxxv. 50), which, however, need not be here mentioned, as some are quite incredible, and the others may be easily explained.


Charmides

Charmides, called also Charmadas by Cicero, a disciple of Cleitomachus the Carthaginian, and a friend and companion (as he had been the fellow-pupil) of Philo of Larissa, in conjunction with whom he is said by some to have been the founder of a fourth Academy. He flourished, therefore, towards the end of the second and at the commencement of the first century B. C. Cicero, writing in B. C. 45, speaks of him as recently dead (Tusc. Disp. i. 24). On the same authority we learn, that he was remarkable for his eloquence and for the great compass and retentiveness of his memory. His philosophical opinions were doubtless coincident with those of Philo (Cic. Acad. Quaest. iv. 6, Orat. 16, de Orat. ii. 88; Plin. H. N. vii. 24).


Eurylochus

Eurylochus, a sceptical philosopher a disciple of Pyrrho, mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (ix. 68). The same writer mentions another Eurylochus of Larissa, to whom Socrates refused to place himself under obligation by accepting money from him, or going to his house (ii. 25).


Philon


Courtesans

Campaspe

Campaspe, called Pancaste (Pankaste) by Aelian, and Pacate (Pakate) by Lucian, of Larissa, the favourite concubine of Alexander, and the first with whom he is said to have had intercourse. Apelles being commissioned by Alexander to paint Campaspe naked, fell in love with her, whereupon Alexander gave her to him as a present. According to some she was the model of Apelles' celebrated picture of the Venus Anadyomene, but according to others Phryne was the original of this painting. (Aelian, V. H. xii. 34; Plin. H. N. xxxv. 10. s. 36.12; Lucian, Imag. 7; Athen. xiii.)


Writers

Heliodorus

Heliodorus, of Larissa, the author of a little work on optics, entitled Kephalaia ton Optikon, which seems to be a fragment or abridgement of the larger work, which is entitled in some MSS. Daamianon philosophou tou Heliosorou Larissaiou peri optikon hupotheseon Biblia b which makes it doubtful whether his true name was Dalmianus or Heliodorus. The work is chiefly taken from Euclid's Optics. The work was printed at Florence, with an Italian version, by Ignatius Dante, with the Optics of Euclid, 1573, 4to.; at Hamburgh by F. Lindenbrog, 1610, at Paris, by Erasmus Bartholinus, 1657, 4to (reprinted 1680); at Cambridge, in Gale's Opuscula Mythologica, 1670. (but it is omitted in the Amsterdam edition, 1688); and lastly, with a Latin version and a dissertation upon the author, by A. Matani, Pistorii, 1758. Some other scientific works of Heliodorus are mentioned.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Nov 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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