EL
Greek Travel Pages

Location information

Listed 11 sub titles with search on: Homeric world for destination: "TEGEA Ancient city ARCADIA".


Homeric world (11)

Greeks of the Homeric Catalogue of Ships

Trojan War

Tegea participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.607).


Greek leaders in the Trojan War

Agapenor

He was the son of Ancaeus and succeeded Echemus to the throne of Tegea. He participated in the Trojan War as the leader of the Arcadians with sixty ships (Il. 2.609). After the war, on the return home, a storm carried his fleet to Cyprus, where Agapenor founded Paphos and built the sanctuary of Aphrodite at Palaepaphos (Paus. 8,5,2-3)..


Agapenor, a son of Ancaeus, and grandson of Lycurgus. He was king of the Arcadians, and received sixty ships from Agamemnon, in which he led his Arcadians to Troy (Hom. Il. ii. 609, &c.; Hygin. Fab. 97). He also occurs among the suitors of Helen (Hygin. Fab. 81; Apollod. iii. 10.8). On his return from Troy he was cast by a storm on the coast of Cyprus, where he founded the town of Paphus, and in it the famous temple of Aphrodite (Paus. viii. 5.2, &c.).



Heroes

Ancaeus

Ancaeus, son of Lycurgus by Eurynome and father of Agapenor, leader of the Arcadians in the Trojan War (Il. 2.609), was an Argonaut and was killed during the hunting of the Calydonian boar (Paus. 8.4.10, 8,45,2).


Ancaeus, (Ankaios). Son of the Arcadian Lycurgus, and father of Agapenor. He was one of the Argonauts, and was killed by the Calydonian boar.


Ancaeus (Ankaios). A son of the Arcadian Lycurgus and Creophile or Eurynome, and father of Agapenor (Apollod. i. 8.2, iii. 9.2, 10.8; Hygin. Fab. 173; Hom. Il. ii. 609). He was one of the Argonauts and partook in the Calydonian hunt, in which he was killed by the boar (Apollod. i. 9.16 and 23; comp. Paus. viii. 5.2, 45.2; Apollon. Rhod. ii. 894; Ov. Met. viii. 400).


Kings

Lycurgus

He was the son of Aleus by Neaera and grandfather of Agapenor. He was notorious for killing by guile Areithous, whom he despoiled and, when he grew old, he gave his mace of iron to Ereuthalion (Il. 7.142).
According to Pausanias, Lycurgus outlived both his sons, Epochus and Ancaeus (Paus. 8,4,10-8,5,1).


Lycurgus, (Lukourgos).King in Arcadia, son of Aleus and Neaera, brother of Cepheus and Auge, husband of Cleophile, Eurynome, or Antinoe, and father of Ancaeus, Epochus, Amphidamas, and Iasus. Lycurgus killed Areithous, who used to fight with a club. Lycurgus bequeathed this club to his slave Ereuthalion, his sons having died before him.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Lycurgus (Lukourgos). A son of Aleus and Neaera, and a brother of Cepheus and Auge, was king in Arcadia, and married to Cleophile, Eurynome, or Antinoe, by whom he became the father of Ancaeus, Epochus, Amphidamas, and Jasus. (Apollod. iii. 9.1, &c.; Schol. ad Apollon. Rhod. i. 164.) Some also call Cepheus his son, and add another of the name of Jocrites. (Apollod. i. 8. 2; Steph. Byz. s. v. Botachidai.) Lycurgus killed Areithous with his lance, meeting him in a narrow valley. He took the club with which his enemy had been armed, and used it himself; and on his death he bequeathed it to his slave Ereuthalion, his sons having died before him. (Horn. Il. vii. 142, &c.; Paus. viii. 4. 7.) His tomb was afterwards shown at Lepreos. (Paus. v. 5. 4.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2006 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


You are able to search for more information in greater and/or surrounding areas by choosing one of the titles below and clicking on "more".

Ferry Departures
From

Copyright 1999-2019 International Publications Ltd.