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Listed 100 (total found 298) sub titles with search on: Mythology for wider area of: "TURKEY Country EUROPE" .


Mythology (298)

Aboriginals

FRYGIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Corybantes

   Corybantes, (Korubantes). The ministers or priests of Rhea, or Cybele, the great mother of the gods, who was worshipped in Phrygia. In their solemn festivals they displayed the most extravagant fury in their dances in armour, as well as in the accompanying music of flutes, cymbals, and drums. Hence korubantismos was the name given to an imaginary disease, in which persons felt as if some great noise were rattling in their ears. The Corybantes are often identified with the Idaean Dactyli, and are thus said to have been the nurses of Zeus when he was suckled by the goat Amalthea in Crete.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


MILITOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Anax

Son of Earth and father of Asterius, king of Anactoria (Miletus).


Anax. A giant, son of Uranus and Gaea, and father of Asterius. The legends of Miletus, which for two generations bore the name of Anactoria, described Anax as king of Anactoria ; but in the reign of his son the town and territory were conquered by the Cretan Miletus, who changed the name Anactoria into Miletus. (Paus. i. 35.5, vii. 2.3.)


Ancient myths

ALAVANDA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Marsyas (river) & Apollo flute competition


AVYDOS (Ancient city) MARMARA

Leander and Hero

(Leandros or Leiandros). A youth of Abydos, who was in love with Hero , the priestess of Aphrodite in Sestus, and swam every night across the Hellespont to visit her, and returned before daybreak. Once during a stormy night he perished in the waves. Next morning his corpse was washed on the coast of Sestus, whereupon Hero threw herself into the sea. This story was the subject of the poem of Musaeus, entitled De Amore Herois et Leandri, and is also mentioned by Ovid and Vergil . In modern times the story has been used by Marlowe, Schiller, Leigh Hunt, and Grillparzer.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Leander (Leiandros), the famous youth of Abydos, who, from love of Hero, the priestess of Aphrodite, in Sestus, swam every night across the Hellespont, being guided by the light of the lighthouse of Sestus. Once during a very stormy night the light was extinguished, and he perished in the waves. On the next morning his corpse was washed on the coast of Sestus, and Hero, on seeing it, threw herself into the sea. This story is the subject of the epic poem of Musaeus, entitled De A more Herois et Leandri, and is also mentioned by Ovid (Her. xviii. 19), Statius (Theb. vi. 535), and Virgil (Georg. iii. 258, &c.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2006 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


FRYGIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Agdistis & Atys

Agdistis: An androgynous monster, sprung from seed of Zeus, mutilated by gods, loves Attis.


Attis or Atys (Atus). A mythological personage in the worship of the Phrygian goddess Cybele-Agdistis. The son of this goddess, so ran the story, had been mutilated by the gods in terror at his gigantic strength, and from his blood sprang the almond-tree. After eating its fruit, Nana, daughter of the river Sangarius, brought forth a boy, whom she exposed. He was brought up first among the wild goats of the forests, and afterwards by some shepherds, and grew up so beautiful that Agdistis fell in love with him. Wishing to wed the daughter of the king of Pessinus in Phrygia, he was driven to madness by the goddess. He then fled to the mountains, and destroyed his manhood at the foot of a pine-tree, which received his spirit, while from his blood sprang violets to garland the tree. Agdistis besought Zeus that the body of her beloved one might know no corruption. Her prayer was heard; a tomb to Attis was raised on Mount Dindymus in the sanctuary of Cybele, the priests of which had to undergo emasculation for Attis's sake. A festival of several days was held in honour of Attis and Cybele in the beginning of spring. A pine-tree, felled in the forest, was covered with violets, and carried to the shrine of Cybele as a symbol of the departed Attis. Then, amid tumultuous music and rites of wildest sorrow, they sought and mourned for Attis on the mountains. On the third day he was found again, the image of the goddess was purified from the contagion of death, and a feast of joy was celebrated, as wild as had been the days of sorrow. The poem of Catullus which deals with the story of Attis, in galliambic metre, is one of the weirdest and most powerful productions in all literature.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Sep 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Atys, Attys, Attes Attis or Attin (Atus, Attus, Attes) A son of Nana, and a beautiful shepherd of the Phrygian town, Celaenae (Theocr. xx. 40; Philostr. Epist. 39; Tertul. de Nat. 1). His story is related in different ways. According to Ovid (Fast. iv. 221), Cybele loved the beautiful shepherd, and made him her own priest on condition that he should preserve his chastity inviolate. Atys broke the covenant with a nymph, the daughter of the river-god Sangarius, and was thrown by the goddess into a state of madness, in which he unmanned himself. When in consequence he wanted to put an end to his life, Cybele changed him into a firtree, which henceforth became sacred to her, and she commanded that, in future, her priests should be eunuchs.Another story relates, that Atys, the priest of Cybele, fled into a forest to escape the voluptuous embraces of a Phrygian king, but that he was overtaken, and in the ensuing struggle unmanned his pursuer. The dying king avenged himself by inflicting the same calamity upon Atys. Atys was found by the priests of Cybele under a fir-tree, at the moment he was expiring. They carried him into the temple of the goddess, and endeavoured to restore him to life, but in vain. Cybele ordained that the death of Atys should be bewailed every year in solemn lamentations, and that henceforth her priests should be eunuchs. A third account says, that Cybele, when exposed by her father, the Phrygian king Maeon, was fed by panthers and brought up by shepherdesses, and that she afterwards secretly married Atys, who was subsequently called Papas. At this moment, Cybele was recognised and kindly received by her parents; but when her connexion with Atys became known to them, Maeon ordered Attis, and the shepherdesses among whom she had lived, to be put to death. Cybele, maddened with grief at this act of her father, traversed the country amid loud lamentations and the sound of cymbals. Phrygia was now visited by an epidemic and scarcity. The oracle commanded that Attis should be buried, and divine honours paid to Cybele; but as the body of the youth was already in a state of decomposition, the funeral honours were paid to an image of him, which was made as a substitute (Diod. iii. 58, &c). According to a fourth story related by Pausanias (vii. 17.5). Atys was a son of the Phrygian king Calaus, and by nature incapable of propagating his race. When he had grown up, he went to Lydia, where he introduced the worship of Cybele. The grateful goddess conceived such an attachment for him, that Zeus in his anger at it, sent a wild boar into Lydia, which killed many of the inhabitants, and among them Atys also. Atys was believed to be buried in Pessinus under mount Agdistis (Paus. i. 4.5). He was worshipped in the temples of Cybele in common with this goddess (vii. 202; Hesych. s. v. Attes). In works of art he is represented as a shepherd with flute and staff. His worship appears to have been introduced into Greece at a comparatively late period. It is an ingenious opinion of Bottiger, that the mythus of Atys represents the two fold character of nature, the male

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Sep 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


The birth fo Atys

Alnond. Virgin impregnated by almond gives birth to Attis.


Philemon & Baucis

Baucis, a Phrygian woman, in whose humble dwelling Jupiter and Mercury were hospitably received, after having been refused admission by every one else in the country. Baucis and her husband Philemon were therefore saved by the gods when they visited the country with an inundation; and Jupiter made Baucis and Philemon priests in his temple; and when the two mortals expressed a wish to die together, Jupiter granted their request by changing them simultaneously into trees. (Ov. Met. viii. 620-724.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


KELENES (Ancient city) TURKEY

Atys, Attys, Attes, Attis, or Attin

Atys, Attys, Attes, Attis, or Attin (Atus). A son of Nana, and a beautiful shepherd of the Phrygian town, Celaenae (Theocr. xx. 40; Philostr. Epist. 39; Tertul. de Nat. 1). His story is related in different ways.
  According to Ovid (Fast. iv. 221), Cybele loved the beautiful shepherd, and made him her own priest on condition that he should preserve his chastity inviolate. Atys broke the covenant with a nymph, the daughter of the river-god Sangarius, and was thrown by the goddess into a state of madness, in which he unmanned himself. When in consequence he wanted to put an end to his life, Cybele changed him into a firtree, which henceforth became sacred to her, and she commanded that, in future, her priests should be eunuchs.
  Another story relates, that Atys, the priest of Cybele, fled into a forest to escape the voluptuous embraces of a Phrygian king, but that he was overtaken, and in the ensuing struggle unmanned his pursuer. The dying king avenged himself by inflicting the same calamity upon Atys. Atys was found by the priests of Cybele under a fir-tree, at the moment he was expiring. They carried him into the temple of the goddess, and endeavoured to restore him to life, but in vain. Cybele ordained that the death of Atys should be bewailed every year in solemn lamentations, and that henceforth her priests should be eunuchs.
  A third account says, that Cybele, when exposed by her father, the Phrygian king Maeon, was fed by panthers and brought up by shepherdesses, and that she afterwards secretly married Atys, who was subsequently called Papas. At this moment, Cybele was recognised and kindly received by her parents; but when her connexion with Atys became known to them, Maeon ordered Attis, and the shepherdesses among whom she had lived, to be put to death. Cybele, maddened with grief at this act of her father, traversed the country amid loud lamentations and the sound of cymbals. Phrygia was now visited by an epidemic and scarcity. The oracle commanded that Attis should be buried, and divine honours paid to Cybele; but as the body of the youth was already in a state of decomposition, the funeral honours were paid to an image of him, which was made as a substitute (Diod. iii. 58, &c.).
  According to a fourth story related by Pausanias (vii. 17.5), Atys was a son of the Phrygian king Calaus, and by nature incapable of propagating his race. When he had grown up, he went to Lydia, where he introduced the worship of Cybele. The grateful goddess conceived such an attachment for him, that Zeus in his anger at it, sent a wild boar into Lydia, which killed many of the inhabitants, and among them Atys also.
  Atys was believed to be buried in Pessinus under mount Agdistis (Paus. i. 4.5). He was worshipped in the temples of Cybele in common with this goddess (vii. 20.; Hesych. s. v. Attes) In works of art he is represented as a shepherd with flute and staff. His worship appears to have been introduced into Greece at a comparatively late period. It is an ingenious opinion of Boettiger (Amalthea, i), that the mythus of Atys represents the twofold character of nature, the male and female, concentrated in one.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Lityerses

Lityerses (Lituerses), a natural son of Midas, lived at Celaenae in Phrygia, engaged in rural pursuits, and hospitably received all strangers that passed his house, but he then compelled them to assist him in the harvest, and whenever they allowed themselves to be surpassed by him in their work, he cut off their heads in the evening, and concealed their bodies in the sheaves, accompanying his deed with songs. Heracles, however, slew him, and threw his body into the Maeander. The Phrygian reapers used to celebrate his memory in a harvestsong which bore the name of Lityerses (Schol. ad Theocrit. x. 41; Athen. x. p. 615, xiv. p. 619; Eustath. ad Hom. p. 1164; Hesych., Phot., Suid. s. v.; Pollux, iv. 54).


KIOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Hylas

Hylas, a son of Theiodamas, king of the Dryopes, by the nymph Menodice (Apollon. Rhod. i. 1213; Hygin. Fab. 14, 271; Propert. i. 20, 6); or, according to others, a son of Heracles, Euphemus, or Ceyx (Schol. ad Theocrit. xiii. 7; Anton. Lib. 26). He was the favourite of Heracles, who, after having killed his father, Theiodamas, took him with him when he joined the expedition of the Argonauts (Apollon. Rhod. i. 131; Orph. Argon. 221). When the Argonauts landed on the coast of Mysia, Hylas went out to fetch water for Heracles; but when lie came to a well, his beauty excited the love of the Naiads, who drew him down into the water, and he was never seen again (Comp. Val. Flacc. iii. 545; Orph. Argon. 637; Theocrit. xiii. 45). Heracles himself endeavoured to trace him, and called out his name, but in vain; and the voice of Hylas was heard from the bottom of the well only like a faint echo, whence some say that he was actually metamorphosed into an echo. While Heracles was engaged in seeking his favourite, the Argonauts sailed away, leaving Heracles and his companion, Polyphemus, behind. He threatened to ravage the country of the Mysians unless they would find out where Hylas was, either dead or alive (Apollon. Rhod, i. 1344). Hence, says the poet, the inhabitants of Cios (Prusa) still continue to seek for Hylas: namely, the inhabitants of Prusa celebrated an annual festival to the divine youth Hylas, and on that occasion the people of the neighbourhood roamed over the mountains calling out the name of Hylas. It was undoubtedly this riotous ceremony that gave rise to the story about Hylas (Theocrit. xiii. 72; Strab. p. 564).

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited April 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


LATMOS (Mountain) KARIA

Endymion & Selene

Endumion. In Greek mythology, the beautiful son of Aethlius (or, according to another story, of Zeus) and Calyce, daughter of Aeolus, king of Elis, father of Epeus, Aetolus, and Paeon, the first of whom won the government of the country by conquering in a race which his father had set on foot. He was loved by Selene, the moon-goddess, by whom he had fifty daughters. They were supposed to symbolize the fifty lunar months which intervened between the Olympic Games. His grave was at Olympia. Another story made him a shepherd or hunter on Mount Latmos in Caria. Zeus bestowed on him eternal youth and eternal life in the form of unbroken slumber. Selene descended every night from heaven to visit and embrace the beautiful sleeper in his grotto. The usual story, however, makes Selene to have thrown him into a sleep so that she might kiss and caress him without his knowledge. A beautiful statue in the British Museum represents Endymion, and the legend inspired Keats to write one of the most exquisite poems in English literature.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Endymion (Endumion), a youth distinguished for his beauty, and renowned in ancient story by the perpetual sleep in which he spent his life. Some traditions about Endymion refer us to Elis, and others to Caria, and others again are a combination of the two. According to the first set of legends, he was a son of Aethlius and Calyce,or of Zeus and Calyce, and succeeded Aethlius in the kingdom of Elis (Paus. v. 1.2). Others again say that he expelled Clymenus from the kingdom of Elis, and introduced into the country Aeolian settlers from Thessaly (Apollod. i. 7.5, &c.; Paus. v. 8.1). Conon (Narrat 14) calls him a son of Zeus and Protogencia, and Hyginus (Fab. 271) a son of Aetolus. He is said to have been married to Asterodia, Chromia, Hyperippe, Neis, or Iphianassa; and Aetolus, Paeon, Epeius. Eurydice, and Naxus are called his children. He was, however, especially beloved by Selene, by whom he had fifty daughters (Paus. v. 1.2). He caused his sons to engage in the race-course at Olympia, and promised to the victor the succession in his kingdom, and Epeius conquered his brothers, and succeeded Endymion as king of Elis. He was believed to be buried at Olympia, which also contained a statue of his in the treasury of the Metapontians (Paus. vi. 19.8, 20.6). According to a tradition, believed at Heracleia in Caria, Endymion had come from Elis to mount Latmus in Caria, whence he is called the Latmian (Latmius; Paus. v. 1. ยง 4; Ov. Ars Am. iii. 83, Trist. ii. 299). He is described by the poets either as a king, a shepherd, or a hunter (Theocrit. iii. 49, xx. 37 with the Scholiast), and while he was slumbering in a cave of mount Latmus, Selene came down to him, kissed, and lay by his side (Comp. Apollon. Rhod. iv. 57). There also he had, in later times, a sanctuary, and his tomb was shewn in a cave of mount Latmus (Paus. v. 1.4; Strab. xiv.). His eternal sleep on Latmus is assigned to different causes in ancient story. Some said that Zeus had granted him a request, and that Endymion begged for immortality, eternal sleep, and everlasting youth (Apollod. i. 7.5.); others relate that he was received among the gods of Olympus, but as he there fell in love with Hera, Zeus, in his anger, punished him by throwing him into eternal sleep on mount Latmus (Schol. ad Theocrit. iii. 49). Others, lastly, state that Selene, charmed with his surpassing beauty, sent him to sleep, that she might be able to kiss him without being observed by him (Cic. Tuscal. i. 38). The stories of the fair sleeper, Endymion, the darling of Selene, are unquestionably poetical fictions, in which sleep is personified. His name and all his attributes confirm this opinion : Endymion signifies a being that gently comes over one; he is called a king, because he has power over all living creatures; a shepherd, because he slumbered in the cool caves of mount Latmus, that is, "the mount of oblivion". Nothing can be more beautiful, lastly, than the notion, that he is kissed by the soft rays of the moon (Comp. Plat. Phaed.; Ov. Am. i. 13. 43). There is a beautiful statue of a sleeping Endymion in the British Museum.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Dec 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks



Selene. The Greek goddess of the moon, daughter of the Titan Hyperion and Theia, sister of Helios and Eos. She was described as a beautiful woman with long wings and golden diadem, from which she shed a mild light, riding in a car drawn by two white horses or mules or cows. The horns of the latter symbolized the crescent moon. In later times she was identified with Artemis (or else with Hecate and Persephone), as was Helios with Phoebus Apollo, and therefore was herself called Phoebe. After this she was also regarded as a huntress and archer, recognizable by her crescent as the goddess of the moon. She was worshipped on the days of the new and full moon. She bore to Zeus a daughter, Pandia, worshipped at Athens with her father at the festival of Pandia. On her love for Endymion, see Endymion. The Romans called her Luna, and had two temples to her at Rome--one on the Aventine and one on the Palatine.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Dec 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


PERGAMOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Auge & Telephus

Telephus was the son of Heracles and Auge, daughter of Aleus. He succeeded Teuthras in the princedom of Mysia.


SISTOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

THEMISKYRA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Heracles' 9th Labor-Hippolyte's Belt

  For the ninth labor, Eurystheus ordered Hercules to bring him the belt of Hippolyte [Hip-POLLY-tee]. This was no ordinary belt and no ordinary warrior. Hippolyte was queen of the Amazons, a tribe of women warriors.
  These Amazons had nothing to do with the Amazon river in South America. Their name comes from a Greek word meaning "missing one breast." This is because an Amazon's right breast got in the way when she threw a spear.The Amazons lived apart from men, and if they ever gave birth to children, they kept only the females and reared them to be warriors like themselves.
  Queen Hippolyte had a special piece of armor. It was a leather belt that had been given to her by Ares, the war god, because she was the best warrior of all the Amazons. She wore this belt across her chest and used it to carry her sword and spear. Eurystheus wanted Hippolyte's belt as a present to give to his daughter, and he sent Hercules to bring it back.
   Hercules' friends realized that the hero could not fight against the whole Amazon army by himself, so they joined with him and set sail in a single ship.
  After a long journey, they reached the land of the Amazons and put in at the harbor. When Hercules and the Greeks got off the boat, Hippolyte came down to visit them. She asked Hercules why he had come, and when he told her, she promised to give him the belt.
  But the goddess Hera knew that the arrival of Hercules meant nothing but trouble for the Amazons. Disguised as an Amazon warrior, Hera went up and down the army saying to each woman that the strangers who had arrived were going to carry off the queen. So the Amazons put on their armor. The women warriors charged on horseback down to the ship.
   But when Hercules saw that they were wearing their armor and were carrying their weapons, he knew that he was under attack. Thinking fast, he drew his sword and killed Hippolyte. Then he undid her belt and took it away from her. Hercules and the Greeks fought the rest of the Amazons in a great battle.
  When the enemy had been driven off, Hercules sailed away. After a stopover at the city of Troy, Hercules returned to Mycenae, and he gave the belt to Eurystheus.

This text is cited July 2004 from Perseus Project URL bellow, which contains interesting hyperlinks


  The ninth labour he (Eurystheus) enjoined on Hercules was to bring the belt of Hippolyte. She was queen of the Amazons, who dwelt about the river Thermodon, a people great in war; for they cultivated the manly virtues, and if ever they gave birth to children through intercourse with the other sex, they reared the females; and they pinched off the right breasts that they might not be trammelled by them in throwing the javelin, but they kept the left breasts, that they might suckle. Now Hippolyte had the belt of Ares in token of her superiority to all the rest. Hercules was sent to fetch this belt because Admete, daughter of Eurystheus, desired to get it. So taking with him a band of volunteer comrades in a single ship he set sail and put in to the island of Paros, which was inhabited by the sons of Minos, to wit, Eurymedon, Chryses, Nephalion, and Philolaus. But it chanced that two of those in the ship landed and were killed by the sons of Minos. Indignant at this, Hercules killed the sons of Minos on the spot and besieged the rest closely, till they sent envoys to request that in the room of the murdered men he would take two, whom he pleased. So he raised the siege, and taking on board the sons of Androgeus, son of Minos, to wit, Alcaeus and Sthenelus, he came to Mysia, to the court of Lycus, son of Dascylus, and was entertained by him; and in a battle between him and the king of the Bebryces Hercules sided with Lycus and slew many, amongst others King Mygdon, brother of Amycus. And he took much land from the Bebryces and gave it to Lycus, who called it all Heraclea.
   Having put in at the harbor of Themiscyra, he received a visit from Hippolyte, who inquired why he was come, and promised to give him the belt. But Hera in the likeness of an Amazon went up and down the multitude saying that the strangers who had arrived were carrying off the queen. So the Amazons in arms charged on horseback down on the ship. But when Hercules saw them in arms, he suspected treachery, and killing Hippolyte stripped her of her belt. And after fighting the rest he sailed away ... and having brought the belt to Mycenae he gave it to Eurystheus.

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited July 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Heracles. 9. The girdle of the queen of the Amazons. Hippolyte, the queen of the Anmilzons, (Diodorus calls the queen Melanippe, and her sister Hippolyte), possessed a girdle, which she had received from Ares, and Admete, the daughter of Eurystheus, wished to have it. Heracles was therefore sent to fetch it, and, accompanied by a number of volunteers, he sailed out in one vessel. He first landed in Paros, where he became involved in a quarrel with the sons of Minos. Having killed two of them, he sailed to Mysia, where his aid was solicited by Lycus, king of the Mariandynians, against the Bebryces. Heracles assisted Lycus, took a district of land from the enemy, which was given to Lycus, who called it Heracleia. When Heracles at length arrived in the port of Themiscyra (Thermodon), after having given to the sea he had crossed the name of Euxeinus, he was at first kindly received by Hippolyte, who promised him her girdle. But Hera, in the disguise of an Amazon, spread the report that the queen of the Amazons was robbed by a stranger. They immediately rose to her assistance, and Heracles, believing that the queen had plotted against him, killed her, took her girdle, and carried it with him. This expedition, which led the hero into distant countries, afforded a favourable opportunity to poets and mythographers for introducing various embellishments and minor adventures, such as the murder of the Boreades, Calais and Zetes, and his amour with Echidna, in the country of the Hyperboreans, by whom he became the father of three sons. On his return he landed in Troas, where he rescued Hesione from the monster sent against her by Poseidon, in return for which her father Laomedon promised him the horses he had received from Zeus as a compensation for Ganymedes. But, as Laomedon did not keep his word, Heracles on leaving threatened to make war against Troy. He therefore landed in Thrace, where he slew Sarpedon, and at length he returned through Macedonia to Peloponnesus. (Apollod. ii. 5.9; Diod. iv. 16; Herod. iv. 9, 10, 82; Eurip. Herc. Fur. 413, Ion. 1143; Plut. Thes. 26; Hom. Il. v. 649, &c.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Nov 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


TRIOPION (Ancient sanctuary) TURKEY

TROY (Ancient city) TURKEY

The Trojan War

Images of the Trojan War Myth, Edited by Robin Mitchell-Boyask, Associate Professor of Classics, Temple University


The Trojan horse


Tithonus and Eos

Tithonus, (Tithonos). The son of Laomedon and Strymo, and brother of Priam. By the prayers of Eos, who loved him, he obtained from the gods immortality, but not eternal youth, in consequence of which he completely shrank together in his old age; whence a decrepit old man was proverbially called Tithonus. Eos changed him into a cicada, or katydid. The story suggested Lord Tennyson's fine poem Tithonus.


Tithonus and Eos : Various WebPages


Hercules & Hesione

Hesione was the daughter of King Laomedon of Troy. Hercules met Hesione after his year of enslavement to Omphale, when he set out for Troy. Hercules found Troy in a state of crisis, as King Laomedon had cheated Poseidon and Apollo by failing to pay them for building the walls. For punishment Poseidon had sent a large sea monster, who would only be appeased by devouring the princess, Hesione. Hercules sought to kill the monster and naturally expected a reward, such as Laomedon's amazing horses. Hercules bravely killed the beast by allowing himself to be swallowed by the monster, whom he then killed from the inside. But once a cheat always a cheat: Laomedon skimped on paying Hercules too.
So Hercules raised an army, including such great men as Telamon, father of Ajax. When his army captured the city, Hercules gave Hesione in marriage to Telamon (they soon gave birth to another hero, Teucer). Hesione was given the opportunity to save any one of her fellow Trojan prisoners: she chose her brother Podarces, later known as Priam.

This text is cited July 2004 from Perseus Project URL bellow, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Hesione. The daughter of Laomedon, king of Troy, and of Leucippe. By her death she was to appease the wrath of Poseidon, who, on account of her father's breaking his word, was devastating the land with a marine monster. Heracles destroyed the monster and set the maiden free; but Laomedon wished to break his promise to the hero, and to deprive him of his stipulated payment. Heracles took Troy, slew Laomedon and his sons, and gave Hesione to his companion Telamon, to whom she bore a son, Teucer.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Hesione, a daughter of Laomedon, and consequently a sister of Priam. When Troy was visited by a plague and a monster on account of Laomedon's breach of promise, Laomedon, in order to get rid of these calamities, chained Hesione to a rock, in accordance with the command of an oracle, where she was to be devoured by wild beasts. Heracles, on his return from the expedition against the Amazons, promised to save her, if Laomedon would give him the horses which he had received from Zeus as a compensation for Ganymedes. Laomedon again promised, but did not keep his word. (Hom. Il. v. 649, &c.; Diod. iv. 42; Apollod. iii. 12.7.) Hesione was afterwards given as a slave to Telamon, by whom she became the mother of Teucrus. Priam sent Antenor to claim her back, and the refusal on the part of the Greeks is mentioned as one of the causes of the Trojan war. (Dares, Phryg. 4, &c.) According to Tzetzes (ad Lycoph. 467), Hesione, already in pregnancy by Telamon, fled from his ship to Miletus, where king Arion found her and her newly-born son, Trambelus, whom he brought up as his own child.
  There are two other mythical personages of this name, one a daughter of Danaus, and by Zeus the mother of Orchomenus (Schol. ad Apollon. Rhod. i. 230), and the other the wife of Nauplius, and the mother of Palamedes, Oeax, land Nausimedon. (Apollod. ii. 1.5.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Nov 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


VYZANTION (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ceroessa

Ceroessa (Keroessa), a daughter of Zeus by Io, and born on the spot where Byzantium was afterwards built. She was brought up by a nymph of the place, and afterwards became the mother of Byzas. (Steph. Byz. s. v. Buzantion.) From this story it must be inferred, that Argos had some share in founding the colony of Byzantium, which is otherwise called a colony of Megara.


Ancient tribes

Arimi & Arima

Arimi (Arimoi) and Arima (ta Arima). The names of a mythical people, district, and range of mountains in Asia Minor, which the old Greek poets made the scene of the punishment of the monster Typhoeus


KYMI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Amazons

Hellanicus and Herodotus and Eudoxus have foisted on us and placing the Amazons between Mysia and Caria and Lydia near Cyme, which is the opinion also of Ephorus, who was a native of Cyme.


Colonizations by the inhabitants

VISII (Ancient city) TURKEY

Daulis in Phocis

Yet one might say that in the ancient times the whole of Greece was a settlement of barbarians, if one reasons from the traditions themselves . . . Daulis in Phocis . . . was once held by the Thracians who came with Tereus.


Tereus lived in Daulis, part of what is now called Phocis, but which at that time was inhabited by Thracians.


Constellations

TROY (Ancient city) TURKEY

Aquarius


Epic poems

Eponymous founders or settlers

ATHYMVRA (Ancient city) KARIA

Athymbrus

Athymbrus (Athumbros), Athymbradus (Athumbrados), and Hybrelus (Hrdrelos), three brothers, who came from Lacedaemon, and founded cities in Lydia, which were called by their names. These cities were afterwards deserted by their inhabitants, who founded together the town of Nysa, whence the latter regarded Athymbrus as its founder (Strab. xiv.; Steph. Byz. s.v. Athumbra).


ATHYMVRADA (Ancient city) KARIA

Athymbrados

Legendary heroe of Sparta (Steph. Byz.)


ENOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Ainos

Gouneos' brother and Odysseus' friend (Steph. Byz.).


ERYTHRES (Ancient city) TURKEY

Erythrus

Son of Rhadamanthys, founds Erythrae.


Erythrus. A son of Rhadamanthus, who led the Erythraeans from Crete to the Ionian Erythrae. (Paus. vii. 3.4.) There are two other mythical personages of the name of Erythrus, or Erythrius, from whom the Boeotian Erythrae, and the Erythraean Sea, are said to have received their names respectively. (Eustath. ad Hom. p. 267; Steph. Byz. s. v. Eruthra; Curtius, viii. 9.)


KAVNOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Kavnos


KIOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Cius

And when Cius, who was also a companion of Heracles and with him on the voyage (of Argonauts), returned from Colchis, he stayed here and founded the city which was named after him.


Cios (Kios), a son of Olympus, from whom Cios (Prusa) on the Propontis derived its name, as he was believed to have led thither a band of colonists from Miletus (Schol. ad Theocrit. xiii. 30; ad Apollon. Rhod. i. 1177). Strabo (xii.) calls him a companion of Heracles who founded Cios on his return from Colchis.


NYSSA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Athymbrus

The story is told that three brothers, Athymbrus and Athymbradus and Hydrelus, who came from Lacedaemon, founded the three cities which were named after them, but that the cities later became scantily populated, and that the city Nysa was founded by their inhabitants; but that Athymbrus is now regarded by them as their original founder (Strab. 14,1,46). Legendary heroe of Sparta (Steph. Byz.).


PIONIES (Ancient city) TURKEY

Pionis

In Mysia beyond the Caicus is a town called Pioniae, the founder of which according to the inhabitants was Pionis, one of the descendants of Heracles. When they are going to sacrifice to him as to a hero, smoke of itself rises up out of the grave. This occurrence, then, I have seen happening. (Paus.9.18.4)


TEFTHRANIA (Ancient city) TURKEY

TEOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Athamas

Teos, at first was founded by Athamas (from Orchomenos), for which reason it is by Anacreon called Athamantis, and at the time of the Ionian colonization by Nauclus, bastard son of Codrus, and after him by Apoecus and Damasus, who were Athenians, and Geres, a Boeotian.


TYANA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Thoas


VYZANTION (Ancient city) TURKEY

Byzas

Byzas (Buzas), a son of Poseidon and Ceroessa, the daughter of Zeus and Io. He was believed to be the founder of Byzantium. (Steph. Byz. s. v.; Diod. iv. 49.) This transplantation of the legend of Io to Byzantium suggests the idea, that colonists from Argos settled there. The leader of the Megarians, who founded Byzantium in n. c. 658, was likewise called Byzas. (Muller, Dor. i. 6.9)


YDRILA (Ancient city) KARIA

Hydrelus

Legendary heroe of Sparta (Steph. Byz.)


Expeditions

THEMISKYRA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Amazonomachy

The Amazons came from the valley of Themiscyra, where the Thermidon river flew, and undertook an expedition against the Athenians and Theseus, which is called Amazonomachy. They worshipped Artemis Ephesian.


First ancestors

DIDYMA (Ancient sanctuary) TURKEY

Branchus & Agriope

Branchus: Father of Cercyon. Argiope: A nymph, mother of Cercyon.


Branchus (Branchos), a son of Apollo or Smicrus of Delphi. His mother, a Milesian woman, dreamt at the time she gave birth to him, that the sun was passing through her body, and the seers interpreted this as a favourable sign. Apollo loved the boy Branchus for his great beauty, and endowed him with prophetic power, which he exercised at Didyma, near Miletus. Here he founded an oracle, of which his descendants, the Branchidae, were the priests, and which was held in great esteem, especially by the lonians and Aeolians. (Herod. i. 157; Strab. xiv., xvii.; Lutat. ad Stat. Theb. viii. 198; Conon, Narrat. 33; Luc. Dial. Deor. 2.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


FRYGIA (Ancient country) TURKEY

Gordias

Father of Midas.


   Gordius, (Gordios). An ancient king of Phrygia, and father of Midas, but originally a poor peasant. Internal disturbances having broken out in Phrygia, an oracle informed the inhabitants that a wagon would bring them a king, who would put an end to their troubles. Shortly afterwards Gordius suddenly appeared riding in his wagon in the assembly of the people, who at once acknowledged him as king. Gordius, out of gratitude, dedicated his chariot to Zeus, in the acropolis of Gordium. The pole was fastened to the yoke by a knot of bark; and an oracle declared that whosoever should untie the knot should reign over all Asia. Alexander, on his arrival at Gordium, cut the knot with his sword, and applied the oracle to himself.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Founders

ALIKARNASSOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Anthas & Hyperus

Sons of Poseidon and Alcyone, from Troezenia.


ARTAKI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Hyrtacus & Arisbe

Hyrtacus, (Hurtakos). A Trojan, to whom Priam gave his own first wife Arisba on marrying Hecuba. Homer makes him the father of Asius, called Hyrtacides. In Vergil, Nisus and Hippocoon are also represented as sons of Hyrtacus.


Hyrtacus (Hurtakos), a Trojan, the husband of Arisbe, and father of Asius and Nisus, who are hence called Hyrtacides (Hom. Il. ii. 837, &c.; Apollod. iii. 12,5; Virg. Aen. ix. 177, 406). A second personage of this name occurs in Virgil. (Aen. v. 492.)


Ide

Ide, a nymph by whom Hyrtacus became the father of Nisus. (Virg. Aen. ix. 177.)


ASPENDOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Polypoetes

Son of Pirithous, son of Pirithous, suitor of Helen, leader of the Gyrtonians against Troy, goes to Colophon and helps to bury Calchas.


ASTAKOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Zypoetes

AThracian, founds Astacus.


EGIROESSA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Menestheus of Athens

. . . Elaea, with harbor and naval station belonging to the Attalic Kings, which was founded by Menestheus and the Athenians who took the expedition with him to Ilium.


ENOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Aenias

(Verg. Aenias 3,17)


FASILIS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Lacius

Founder of Phaselis after indication of an oracle at Delphi.


FOKEA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Philogenes & Damon

Phocaea was founded by the Athenians under Philogenes (Strabo). Ships for the voyage were given to the Phocians by Philogenes and Damon, Athenians and sons of Euctemon, who themselves led the colony (Pausanias)


GRYNIA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Menestheus


KIOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Polyphemus

There (in Mysia) they (Argonauts) left Hercules and Polyphemus. For Hylas, son of Thiodamas, a minion of Hercules, had been sent to draw water and was ravished away by nymphs on account of his beauty. But Polyphemus heard him cry out, and drawing his sword gave chase in the belief that he was being carried off by robbers. Falling in with Hercules, he told him; and while the two were seeking for Hylas, the ship put to sea. So Polyphemus founded a city Cius in Mysia and reigned as king; but Hercules returned to Argos. However Herodorus says that Hercules did not sail at all at that time, but served as a slave at the court of Omphale. But Pherecydes says that he was left behind at Aphetae in Thessaly, the Argo having declared with human voice that she could not bear his weight. Nevertheless Demaratus has recorded that Hercules sailed to Colchis; for Dionysius even affirms that he was the leader of the Argonauts.


Polyphemus. A son of Elatus or Poseidon and Hippea, was one of the Lapithae at Larissa in Thessaly. He was married to Laonome, a sister of Heracles, with whom he was connected by friendship. He was also one of the Argonauts, butt being left behind by them in Mysia, he founded Cios, and fell against the Chalybes. (Hom. Il. i. 264; Schol. ad Apolton. Rkod. i. 40, 1241, iv. 1470; Val. Flacc. i. 457; Apllod. i. 9. 16, 19.)


KLAZOMENES (Ancient city) TURKEY

Parphorus

A Colophonian.


KOLOFON (Ancient city) TURKEY

Andraemon of Pylos

Colophon was founded by Andraemon a Pylian, according to Mimnermus in his Nanno


KYMI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Amazon Cyme


Pelops


LAODIKIA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Antiochus II


LEVEDOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Andropompus

Son of Borus, slays Xanthus, son of Ptolemy.


MALLOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Mopsus

A diviner, son of Apollo and Manto, defeats Calchas in a trial of skill, son of Rhacius and Manto, slain by Amphilochus, son of Alcmaeon, in single combat.


Amphilochus

Son of Amphiaraus, younger than his brother Alcmaeon, helps his brother Alcmaeon to kill their mother Eriphyle, suitor of Helen, one of the Epigoni, last king of Argos of the house of Melampus, settles among Amphilochians, altar at Athens, oracle at Mallus, shrine at Oropus, shrine at Sparta, altar of children of A. at Oropus.


MILITOS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Neleus

Miletus was founded by Neleus, a Pylian by birth.


Sarpedon

Son of Zeus by Europa or Laodamia, Minos' brother, his banishment by Minos and his rule in Lycia, quarrels with Minos and flies from him, flees from Crete to Lycia, becomes king of Lycia, leader of the Lycians at Troy, killed by Patroclus, Sarpedon and Memnon painted by Polygnotus.


MOPSOUESTIA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Mopsus

   The son of Apollo and Manto, the daughter of Tiresias, and also a celebrated seer. He contended in prophecy with Calchas at Colophon, and showed himself superior to the latter in prophetic power. He was believed to have founded Mallos in Cilicia in conjunction with the seer Amphilochus. A dispute arose between the two seers respecting the possession of the town, and both fell in combat by each other's hands. Mopsus had an oracle at Mallos, which existed as late as the time of Strabo.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


MYOUS (Ancient city) TURKEY

Cydrelus

Myus was founded by Cydrelus, bastard son of Codrus


MYRINA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Amazon Myrina

And there are certain cities, it is said, which got their names from the Amazons, I mean Ephesus, Smyrna, Cyme, and Myrina.


PRIINI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Aepytus

Priene was founded by Aepytus the son of Neleus (of Miletos), and then later by Philotas, who brought a colony from Thebes


Philotas

A Theban, descendant of Peneleos, joint founder of Priene.


Philotas

Priene is by some writers called Cadme, since Philotas, who founded it, was a Boeotian


PYGELA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Agamemnon

Pygela, a small town, with a temple of Artemis Munychia, founded by Agamemnon and inhabited by a part of his troops


SINOPI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Autolycus

Autolycus, a Thessalian, son of Deimachus, who together with his brothers Deileon and Phlogius joined Heracles in his expedition against the Amazons. But after having gone astray the two brothers dwelt at Sinope, until they joined the expedition of the Argonauts. (Apollon. Rhod. ii. 955, &c.; Valer. Flacc. v. 115.) He was subsequently regarded as the founder of Sinope, where he was worshipped as a god and had an oracle. After the conquest of Sinope by the Romans, his statue was carried from thence by Lucullus to Rome (Strab. xii.). It must be noticed. that Hyginus (Fab. 14) calls him a son of Phrixus and Chalciope, and a brother of Phronius, Demoleon, and Phlogius.


SMYRNI (Ancient city) TURKEY

Amazon Smyrna

And there are certain cities, it is said, which got their names from the Amazons, I mean Ephesus, Smyrna, Cyme, and Myrina.


SYNNADA (Ancient city) TURKEY

Acamas

According to Greek mythology, Acamas, hero of the Trojan War, founded the city.


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