Information about the place PLAKA (City quarter) ATHENS - GTP - Greek Travel Pages

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Listed 5 sub titles with search on: Information about the place  for wider area of: "PLAKA City quarter ATHENS" .


Information about the place (5)

Miscellaneous

Cydathenaeum

KYDATHINEI (Ancient demos) ATHENS
It is positioned within the city of Athens, and more accurately to the N & NE slope of the Acropolis.

General

Collytus

KOLLYTOS (Ancient demos) ATHENS
The ancient deme was probably located to the south of Agora.

Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Colyttus

Collytus (Kollutos, not Koluttos: Eth. Kolluteis). A demus belonging to the tribe Aegeis, and probably, as we have already said, sometimes included under the general name of Melite. It appears from a passage of Strabo (i. p. 65) that Collytus and Melite were adjacent, but that their boundaries were not accurately marked, a passage which both Leake and Wordsworth have erroneously supposed to mean that these places had precise boundaries. (It is evident, however, that Collytus and Melite are quoted as an example of me onton akribon horon.) Wordsworth, moreover, remarks that it was the least respectable quarter in the whole of Athens: but we know, on the contrary, that it was a favourite place of residence. Hence Plutarch says (de Exsil. 6, p. 601), neither do all Athenians inhabit Collytus, nor Corinthians Craneium, nor Spartans Pitane, Craneium and Pitane being two favourite localities in Corinth and Sparta respectively. It is described by Himerius (ap. Phot. Cod.. 243, p. 375, Bekker), as a stenopos (which does not mean a narrow street, but simply a street, comp. Diod. xii. 10.; Hesych. s. v.), situated. in the centre of the city, and much valued, for its use of the market (agoras chreiai timomenos), by which words we, are probably to understand that it was conveniently situated for the use of the market. Forchhammer places Collytus between the hills of Pnyx and Museium, in which case the expression of its being in the centre of the city, must not be interpreted strictly. The same writer also supposes stenopos not to signify a street, but the whole district between the Pnyx and the Museium, including the slopes of those hills. Leake thinks that Collytus bordered upon Diomeia, and accordingly places it between Melite and Diomeia; but the authority to which he refers would point to an opposite conclusion, namely, that Collytus and Diomeia were situated on opposite sides of the city. We are told that Collytus was the father of Diomus, the favourite of Hercules; and that some of the Melitenses, under the guidance of Diomus, migrated from Melite, and settled in the spot called Diomeia, from their leader, where they celebrated the Metageitnia, in memory of their origin. (Plut. de Exsil. l. c.; Steph. B. s. v. Diomeia; Hesych. s. v. Diomeieis.) This legend confirms the preceding account of Collytus being situated in Melite. We have already seen that there was a theatre in Collytus, in which Aeschines played the part of Oenomaus; and we are also told that he lived in this district 45 years. (Aesch. Ep. 5.) Collytus was also the residence of Timon, the misanthrope (Lucian, Timon, 7, 44), and was celebrated as the demus of Plato.

This extract is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Cydathenaeum

KYDATHINEI (Ancient demos) ATHENS
Cydathenaeum, Kudathenaion: Eth. Kudathenaieis. A demus belonging to the tribe Pandionis. (Harp. Suid. Steph. Phot.) The name is apparently compounded of kudos glory, and Athenaios, and is hence explained by Hesychius as endoxos Athenaios.

This extract is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

Collytus

KOLLYTOS (Ancient demos) ATHENS
A deme of Attica belonging to the tribe Aegeis, and forming one of the districts into which the city of Athens was divided. It was the deme of Plato the philosopher.

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