Information about the place PYLIA (Province) MESSINIA - GTP - Greek Travel Pages

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Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Asine

ASSINI (Ancient city) KORONI
  Eth. Asinaios, Asineus. A town in Messenia, which was built by the Dryopes, when they were expelled from Asine in the Argeia, as related above. (Pans. ll. cc.) It stood on the western side of the Messenian gulf, which was sometimes called the Asinaean gulf, from this town (Asinai_os kolpos, Strab. viii. p. 359; Asinaeus Sinus, Plin. iv. 5. s. 7). Asine was distant 40 stadia north of the promontory Acritas, 40 stadia from Colonides (Pans. iv. 34. § 12), 15 miles from Methona, and 30 miles from Messene (Tab. Peut.). Its site is now occupied by Koroni, which is situated upon a hill jutting out into the sea above C. Gallo (the ancient Acritas). The ancient town of Corone was situated further north; and it has been reasonably conjectured that the inhabitants of Corone removed from their town to the deserted site of Asine, and carried with them their ancient name,--such a migration of names not being uncommon in Greece.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited May 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Colonides

KOLONIDES (Ancient city) EPIA
Colonides, Kolonides. A town in the SW. of Messenia, described by Pausanias as standing upon a height at a short distance from the sea, and 40 stadia from Asine. The inhabitants affirmed that they were not Messenians, but a colony led from Athens by Colaenus. It is mentioned by Plutarch (Philop. 18) under the name of Colonis (Kolonis) as a place which Philopoemen marched to relieve; but according to the narrative of Livy (xxxix. 49) Corone was the place towards which Philopoemen marched. The site of Colonides is uncertain. Leake places it upon the Messenian gulf at Kastelia, where are some remains of ancient buildings, N. of Koroni, the site of Asine; but the French commission suppose it to have stood on the bay of Phoenicus, NW. of the promontory Acritas.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Corone

KORONI (Ancient city) PETALIDI
  Korone: Eth. Koronaeus, Koroneus, Koronuieus, Koronaios (Steph. B.: Petalidhi). A town of Messenia, situated upon the western side of the Messenian gulf, which was sometimes called after it, the Coronaean. (Plin. iv. 5. s. 7.) According to Pausanias, it was built on the site of the Homeric Aepeia, at the time of the restoration of the Messenians to their native country, by Epaminondas; and received the name of Coroneia because Epimelides, who founded the new town, was a native of Coroneia, in Boeotia. This name was changed by the Messenians into that of Corone. According to others, Corone corresponded to the Homeric Pedasus. (Strab. viii. p. 360.) In the acropolis of the city was a brazen statue of Athena, who became the patron deity of Corone in consequence of her worship at Coroneia. In the agora there was a statue of Zeus Zoter, as at Messene; and there were likewise in the lower city temples of Artemis, of Dionysus, and of Asclepius. The harbour of Corone was called the port of the Achaeans, probably because the city belonged to the Achaean league. (Paus. iv. 34.)
  Pausanias says that Corone was situated to the right of the Pamisus, close to the sea, and at the foot of a mountain called Temathia or Mathia (the reading is doubtful). The present name of the mountain is Lykodimo, at the foot of which stands Petalidhi, on the site of Corone, in a small but fertile plain. Within the last few years a colony of Mainotes has settled here, and restored to the place its ancient name. The modern town of Koroni, however, which is situated upon a promontory some distance south of Petalidhi, occupies the site of Asine. It is probable that the inhabitants of Corone migrated at some period to Asine, carrying with them their ancient name.
   There are considerable remains of Corone. Part of a mole may still be traced jutting out into the sea, and in the plain have been found foundations of houses and walls, and some works of ancient art. There are likewise traces of the walls of the acropolis upon the heights above the plain.
  Corone was supplied with water for drinking from the fountain Plataniston, which flowed from a hollow plane tree 20 stadia from the road, leading from the Pamisus. Eighty stadia south of Corone, near the coast, was the temple of Apollo Corynthus, the site of which is probably indicated by some ancient remains on the hill of St. Elias, near the sea, above the village of Kastelia. Corone, as already stated, belonged to the Achaean league. It was on his march to relieve this city that Philopoemen was made prisoner, and put to death at Messene on the following day. (Liv. xxxix. 49.) Plutarch, however, relates that Philopoemen was captured on his march towards Colonis (Plut. Philopoem. 18); but the statement of Livy is the more probable one. Corone is also mentioned by Ptolemy (iii. 16. § 8).

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Methone

METHONI (Ancient city) MESSINIA
  Methone, Mothone, Eth. Mothonaios, Methonaieus (Steph. B. s. v.: Mothoni, Modon). An ancient town in the SW. corner of Messenia, has always been an important place, both in ancient and in modern times, on account of its excellent harbour and salubrious situation. It is situated at the extreme point of a rocky ridge, which runs into the sea, opposite the island Sapienza, one of the group called in ancient times Oenussae. Off the outer end of the town, is the little insulated rock which Pausanias (iv. 35. § 1) calls Mothon, and which he describes as forming at once a narrow entrance and a shelter to the harbour of his time: it is now occupied by a tower and lantern, which is connected by a bridge with the fortification of Mothoni. A mole branches from it, which runs parallel to the eastern wall of the town, and forms a harbour for small vessels. It seems to be exactly in the position of the ancient port, the entrance into which was probably where the bridge now stands. (Leake.) According to the unanimous testimony of the ancient writers (Strab. viii. p. 359; Paus. iv. 35. § 1), Methone was the Homeric Pedasus, one of the seven cities which Agamemnon offered to Achilles. (Hom. Il. ix. 294.) Homer gives to Pedasus the epithet ampeloessa, and Methone seems to have been celebrated in antiquity for the cultivation of the vine. The eponymous heroine Methone, is called the daughter of Oeneus, the wineman (Paus. l. c.); and the same name occurs in the islands Oenussae, lying opposite the city. The name of Methone first occurs in the Messenian wars. Methone and Pylus were the only two places which the Messenians continued to hold in the second war, after they had retired to the mountain fortress of Ira. (Paus. iv. 18. § 1, iv. 23. § 1.) At the end of the Second Messenian War, the Lacedaemonians gave Methone to the inhabitants of Nauplia, who had lately been expelled from their own city by the Argives. (Paus. iv. 24. § 4, iv. 35. § 2.) The descendants of the Nauplians continued to inhabit Methone, and were allowed to remain there even after the restoration of the Messenian state by Epaminondas. (Paus. iv. 27. § 8.) In the first year of the Peloponnesian War, B.C. 431, the Athenians attempted to obtain possession of Methone, but were repulsed by Brasidas. (Thuc. ii. 25.) Methone suffered greatly from an attack of some Illyrian privateers, who, under the pretext of purchasing wine, entered into intercourse with the inhabitants and carried off a great number of them. (Paus. iv. 35. § § 6, 7.) Shortly before the battle of Actium, Methone, which had been strongly fortified by Antony, was besieged and taken by Agrippa, who found there Bogud, king of Mauretania, whom he put to death. (Dion Cass. 1. 11; Strab. viii. p. 359; Oros. vi. 19.) Methone was favoured by Trajan, who made it a free city. (Paus. iv. 35. § 3.) It is also mentioned by Mela (ii. 3), Pliny (iv. 5. s. 7), Ptolemy (iii. 15. § 7), and Hierocles.
  Pausanias found at Methone a temple of Athena Anemotis, the storm-stiller, and one of Artemis. He also mentions a well of bituminous water, similar both in smell and colour to the ointment of Cyzicus, but of which no trace is now found. In 1124 Modon was conquered by Venice, but did not become a permanent possession of the republic till 1204. In the middle of the old Venetian piazza there still stands the shaft of an ancient granite column, about 3 feet in diameter and 12 feet high, with a barbarous base and capital, which appear to have been added by the Venetians, when they fixed upon the top of it, in 1493, a figure of the Lion of St. Mark. Five years afterwards it was taken by the Turks, and remained in their hands till it was recaptured by Morosini. In 1715 the Turks again took possession of it, and retained it till the last Greek revolution, when it was wrested from them by the French in 1828. Like other places in Greece, which have been continuously inhabited, Modon contains few ancient remains. Some Hellenic foundations may be traced in the city-walls, and ancient sepulchres may be seen above the suburb.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

Phoenicus

FINIKOUS (Ancient city) METHONI
A harbour in Messenia.

Oenusae

INOUSSES (Island complex) PYLIA
A town in Messenia, on the western coast, on a promontory and bay of the same name.

Corone

KORONI (Ancient city) PETALIDI
A town in Messenia on the west side of the Messenian Gulf, founded B.C. 371 by the Messenians, after their return to their native country, with the assistance of the Thebans.

Local government Web-Sites

Municipality of Methoni

METHONI (Municipality) MESSINIA

Local government WebPages

Agia Marina

AGIA MARIANI (Isolated island) INOUSSES
It is located between the islands of Schiza and Sapientza. It is a small, low island covered in rich underbush. The church of Santa Marina is located on the island, which pilgrims visit on the 17th of July each year.

St. Andreas

AGIOS ANDREAS (Settlement) EPIA
The area of St. Andreas is an archaeological site and between the community and Logga there is the ancient temple of Apollo while the archaeological spade has brought to light a brass statuette depicting archer, ancient tombs, a small brass bell with the Latin date 1634 (St. Andreas), a marble byzantine round top with a sculptured byzantine cross with the letters «A-Ω» on it as well as marble pillars with Byzantine decorations of crosses, rodakes and laurel. Between Petalidi and Logga there was «polisma» with the temple of Inous.

This extract is cited March 2003 from the Messenia Prefecture Tourism Promotion Commission URL below, which contains image.


Bomba

BOBA (Isolated island) INOUSSES
To the south, we come accross a large closed bay, Porto Logo the safe harbour of the sailors and the fleets. coming into the bay, we pass by the islet of Bomba, where according to legend the Apostle Paul landed when his ship sailed into a storm on its way to Rome. The bottom of the bay is strewn with shipwrecks.

Finikounda

FINIKOUDAS (Village) METHONI
Finikounda is a picturesque fishing vallage between Koroni and Methoni with a magnificent gravel sand beach which is visited by many tourists every year. Green hills, valleys crossed by small rivers, flat areas, endless sandy beaches lacy bays and 4 islands in its horizon which are within a 10-minute distance; Schiza, Sapietza, Venetiko and St. Marina which surround a clean and calm sea. During the Protohellenic Era, it developed as a naval and transportation centre, while in the area of Analipsis have been found walls and ostraka (fragments of vases)of the era. The ancient Finikes who were a naval nation found the community «Finikous» where Anemomylos, of contemporary Finikounda, is today. The increasing number of tourists every year has created an excellent touristic infrastructure with hotels, rooms to rent, campsites, areas for recreation and leisure as well as tavernas with fresh fish.

This extract is cited March 2003 from the Messenia Prefecture Tourism Promotion Commission URL below, which contains image.


INOUSSES (Island complex) PYLIA

Koroni

KORONI (Small town) MESSINIA
  Koroni, the Byzantine lady, was one of the most important commercial and naval Venetian centres of the East. It is built ei a position from which it dominates both the Messinian Gulf and the area of Eastern Pylia, keeping its nobility till today.
  It was founded by refugees from argolian Asini, who were brought to settle the area by the Spartans after the ending of the A' (1st) Messinian War in 740 B.C approximately and named it Asini.
  Around the 9th century A.D. the inhabitants of Koroni(Petalidi) moved and settled the top of the rock in order to protect themselves against brigands and pirates and this is where the medieval castle is today.
  Later, they spread by the feet of the rock where the ancient city Asini was. Koroni was conquered by the Franks in 1205 while, in 1209 with the Treaty of Sapietza, the Venetians became,until 1500, the lords of the city turning it into the commercial and financial centre of Eastern Europe. In 1500 A.D. it was conquered by the Turks of the sultan Vagiazit B' who dominated it until 1828, except for the time from 1685 to 1715 when the Venetian Morozini tried to give the city its old splendor. The city was liberated from the Turkish rule on the 18th October 1828 by general Maizon's troops. The first commandant was Nikitaras who was a hero of the Greek Revolution of 1821.
  Today, it still remains the financial centre of the area, keeping its character as it was created and shaped in the course of history with a lot of the characteristics of an island. It welcomes a lot of visitors every year who seek serenity and tranquillity in the endless blue of the Mediterranean the sun on its wonderful beach of Zaga, Memis and Artakis and the venetian colour which it lent by its medieval castle and narrow streets.

This text is cited March 2003 from the Messenia Prefecture Tourism Promotion Commission URL below, which contains image.


Logga

LONGA (Small town) EPIA
It used to be part of the hitherto borough of Epia. Logga used to be a small village before 1900, and St. Andreas was bigger. St. Andreas is now a holiday resort and the sea of the Messinian Gulf with Taygetos in the background, and the dazzling beaches of Messinian Mani stretch across it. According to Andronikos, Logga existed from the years of the Sarakini of Crete while it was later invaded by the Eneti during the Frank ruling in 1209 and, subsequently, by the Turks, which made many inhabitants move higher up and build a city. This protected them from the Venetian boats and the Turkish armadas which dominated the seas. In the south part of Logga there are remnants of buildings which date back to the Turkish - rule years. The old narrow roads were, according to tradition, constructed by Pasha-Ali. The endless olive grove was burnt by Ibrahem in 1827 in revenge for the fact that the inhabitants had fought against him in battles.

This extract is cited March 2003 from the Messenia Prefecture Tourism Promotion Commission URL below, which contains image.


Methoni

METHONI (Small town) MESSINIA
  Methoni is at the southwest part of Messinia and is one of the most historical cities of the Peloponnese. During the domination by the Eneti(1209-1500 and 1685-1715), it constituted the main commercial and naval centre of the East, with Koroni, where you could find a boat to travel anywhere you wanted. Methoni is the continuation of the homeric city Pegasos and, according to some, it got its name from the Methona Litho (=stone) a rock in the sea, on which Bourtzi is built as a part of its medieval castle.
  From Methoni the Messinians, beaten by the Spartans at the end of the Second Messinian war (640-610 B.C), immigrate to metapontio of Lower Italy and consequently the Spartans brought settlers from Nafplio and put them in Methoni.
  During the roman years (31 B.C - 330 A.D) it was a flourishing city, while its greatest prosperity was met during the Middle Ages under the rule of the Eneti from 1209 to 1500. In 1500 it was conquered by the Turks of the sultan Vagiazit B’ who destroyed it completely. In the mid-16th century it was taken over by the Maltan knights and later by Eneti (1686-1715). The second period of turkish rule was from 1715 to 1828 when it was liberated by the army of the French general Maizon.
  Today, Methoni has excellent touristic infrastructure with hotels, campsites and rooms to rent while in its tavernas you can enjoy an abundance of fresh fish. The visitor can enjoy the sun and the sea on its golden beach with its granular sand. One can also visit the medieval castle, the church of St. Onoufrios, which is built in a cave 4 Km away from the city, as well as the catacombs on the hill of St. Nikolaos 1 Km away from the city. During the first Monday of Lent revives the custom of «the Marriage of Koutroulis» which dates back to the IE΄ century and it’s about two men who dress up as a bride and a bridegroom, go to the central square and get married. There is a priest and a best man and, after the marriage settlement is read in the presence of the crowd, there is a feast.

This text is cited March 2003 from the Messenia Prefecture Tourism Promotion Commission URL below, which contains image.


Petalidi

PETALIDI (Small town) MESSINIA
On the west coast of the Messinian Gulf and on the road Rizomylos-Koroni there is Petalidi which is a magnificent resort for many visitors who are looking for calmness in the endless blue of the sea and the silver-green of the olive groves. It is situated where the homeric Epia was (1580-1120 B.C), which was one of the seven cities which Agamemnon offered to Achilles.Koroni was also built on the same spot in the 4th century B.C. by Epimiledes, a representative of the general Epaminondas from Koronia of Boetia. In 1828, after the Naval battle of Navarino, the French general Maizon disembarked with 14000 soldiers to make Ibrahem Pasha abandon Greece. In 1830, it was built in the area of Mycaenean Epia (1580-1120 B.C) for the settlement of fighters who were from Mani and participated in the Revolution.

This extract is cited March 2003 from the Messenia Prefecture Tourism Promotion Commission URL below, which contains image.


Oinnousai Pit

PIT OF OINOUSSES (Deep sea point) INOUSSES
At the southest part of the island there are two islets, called Dyo Adelfia. To their southeast, the Oinnousai Pit is located, an underwater abyss that reaches to the deapest part of the Mediterranean, at 5.121 m., where reasearch for the "NESTOR" experiment is cunducted and has to to with neutrinos and the past of the universe. Many greek and international institutions contribute to this effort.

Pylos

PYLOS (Small town) MESSINIA
  Pylos is built on the south part of Messinia by the bay of Navarino combining mainland architecture with the beauty of an island and constitutes a commercial and administrative centre for Southwest Messinia. It is an important centre for the refuelling of ship as it is on the course of the ship which join the markets of the West to those of the East. It is an archaeological, historical and touristic place. Its port is one of the best and the safest natural ports of the Mediterranean and it has become famous for the naval battle that took place there on the 20th October 1827 between the fleet of Ibrahem Pasha and the Turks against the Allied forces of England-France-Russia. The Allied forces won, which brought about the victory of the Greek fighters during the Revolution against the Turkish invaders.
  Ancient Pylos (Koryfasio) is thought to have been in the area of cape Koryfasio in the north of the contemporary city. The homeric Pylos was initially settled by the mythological Pylo with the Leleges from Megara. Nileas from Ioklos of Thessaly forced Pylo to leave and established his own kingdom which became famous because of the wise King, Nestoras, who built his royal palace on the hill of Eglianos. In 1831, the rock of the subsequent Navarino is invaded by the Navarrei(Vaski) of Jacob De Bo, who built the castle Castle of Navarrei.
  In 1573, the Turks become the lords of the city and construct another castle at the mouth of the port which is named «Niokastro». After the battle at Sfaktiria, in May 1825, Ibrahem Pasha obtains the castle again and drives out its Greek revolutionary defenders. The historical Naval battle of Navarino seals the struggle of Greeks for freedom, establishing Pylos as a place for friendship and co-operation among the nations.
  Today, Pylos is an administrative and commercial centre for the Southwest Messinia, 52 Km away from Kalamata, with excellent touristic infrastucture like hotels, restaurants and marinas for boats and yachts.

This text is cited March 2003 from the Messenia Prefecture Tourism Promotion Commission URL below, which contains image.


SAPIENTZA (Small island) METHONI
  The most important and beautiful island in the Oinoussai complex is Sapientza. It has been the favourite docking place for every fleet that had business with the cities of Methoni and Koroni, these important cities of the Mediterranean during the whole span of the middle ages. With the Sapientza Treaty in 1209 it passed in the hands of the Venetians. It has been used as adocking area for the Turks and the Venetians during the third Venetian-Turkish war, and as a base of operations for the Greek fleet in 1825. The ships that usually sailed near the coast of the island frequently crashed on its rocky coast resulting in the discovery of many important shiprwrecks from all the historical periods. One of these sank at the north part of Sapientza with its stolen cargo which was the pillars from the Grand Peristyle built by Herod in Caissareia, Palestine, in the 1st century A.D.
  Another great shipwreck located in the northwest of the island, is the Sarchophagi shipwreck as it is called (Roman sarchophagi by sculpted titanian stone). The shipwrecks around Sapientza are so numerous and important that there is a thought for the creation of an underwater archaeological park. Sapientza is a low island with an area of 9 square kilometres, its highest peak being on its north part, Foveri, at a height of 219 m. The slopes of the island climb up in lush greenery, and the crlystal clear waters of the sea, have a unique exotic colour.

This extract is cited March 2004 from the Municipality of Methoni URL below.


Schiza

SCHIZA (Small island) INOUSSES
West of cape Akritas, lies the biggest island of the Oinoussai, Schiza, called Cabrera of Carbera in the past. Schiza is an island with an irregular shape, covers and area of 12 square kilometers, and its tallest peak is Vigla at a height of 201 metres on the north part of the island. Its shoreline is rocky with deep waters and there is only a closed calm bay on its south side. Schiza is covered by bushes and herds of goats graze on its soil. Access to the island is forbidden because it is used as a military exercise firing field by the Air Force.

This text is cited March 2004 from the Municipality of Methoni URL below.


Island Sfaktiria

SFAKTIRIA (Small island) PYLOS
It is located in the west part of the bay of Navarino and blocks it from the Ionian Sea. It is a historic place and has been connected with the great victory of Athenians over the Staptans during the Peloponnesean War in 425 B.C. under the guidance of general Demosthenes who forced the garrison of the island to surrender after being besieged by the navy for 72 days. In memory of this victory the sculptor Paeonios created the magnificent statue of the «Victory of Paeonios». Greeks and Philhellenes, during the Revolution of 1821, met a tragic death fighting against Ibrahem Pasha in May 1825 when he came from Egypt to help Turks suppress the Greek Revolution.

This extract is cited March 2003 from the Messenia Prefecture Tourism Promotion Commission URL below, which contains image.


Maps

METHONI (Municipality) MESSINIA

Other locations

Ammos

SAPIENTZA (Small island) METHONI
The coastline of the island is rocky steep in some parts, while gentle in others. There is only one sandy beach on the island but is a real gem. This beach is located on the north part of the island, facing Methoni and is called Ammos. It is protected by the northwestern winds and has a basic docking area and a wooden gazeebo where one can rest.

Fragoklissia

On the northern hills of the island is a location called "Fragkokklisia". This may be the place where the Benedictine monastery (or St. John's of Jerusalem order) was located, where the treaty of Sapientza was signed, in 1209.

Porto Longo

To the south, we come accross a large closed bay, Porto Logo the safe harbour of the sailors and the fleets. coming into the bay, we pass by the islet of Bomba, where according to legend the Apostle Paul landed when his ship sailed into a storm on its way to Rome. The bottom of the bay is strewn with shipwrecks.

Maneta's gulf

The west coasts of Sapientza are steep and wild, almost always stormy. In this part the protected small bay of Maneta is located. Legends tell us that the renown pirate Manetas used the cave that was here as his hideout, and launched all attacks to passing ships from here. Nowadays, the cave does not exist.

This extract is cited March 2004 from the Municipality of Methoni URL below.


Perseus Project

Asine

ASSINI (Ancient city) KORONI

KORONI (Ancient city) PETALIDI

Perseus Project index

Present location

FINIKOUS (Ancient city) METHONI
The ancient Phoenicians founded the town in the Anemomylos location. In the Analipsi location cells and a wall have been found.

Kastelli

KOLONIDES (Ancient city) EPIA

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites

Koroni

KORONI (Small town) MESSINIA
  A large building, 4.8 N of modern Koroni, which was probably the villa of a rich man or a gymnasium, can be dated in the Early Imperial period. It had three rooms, while a fourth room was situated ca. 30 m farther to the E. In the first room (5.7 m each side) a superb mosaic was discovered, which is now preserved in the Benakeion Museum at Kalamata. The stones of the mosaic vary in size, shape, and color. In the center of a simple sixfold frame was a quadrangular field (3.1 x 3.1 m) divided by plaited borders into a central circle, four semicircles, and four quarter circles, the last in the corners. In the central circle are depicted a Satyr, a panther, and, between them, Dionysos. In the four surrounding semicircles are painted scenes from the amphitheater (bull with gladiator), lion with gladiator, the scene of a tigerhunt, and a hunter (ill-preserved). Between the central circle and the corners are square fields with theatrical masks hung from red ribbons (two male, one female, one lost) while in the NW, SW corners are painted kantharoi surrounded by branches, and in the NE a running female panther. The fourth one (SW), probably occupied by another panther, is entirely lost. The mosaic themes of the other rooms form ornamental compositions.

G. S. Korres, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Koroni

KORONI (Ancient city) PETALIDI
  ca. 30 km W-SW of Kalamata. Koroni was a town under Mt. Mathia (now Lycodemon), on Koronaeus Bay in the NW part of the Messenian Gulf. It is generally accepted (except for one scholar who believes that the present Koroni occupies the site of the ancient one) that Petalidi village corresponds to the site of ancient Koroni. Petalidi Bay is the safest of all Peloponnesian ports and was called "port of the Achaeans". Parts of the ancient dock can still be seen in the sea. The older name of Koroni was Aipeia (Paus. 4.34.5) or Pedasos (Strab. 8.360). The name of the town refers to the Boiotian Koroneia whence came the founder Epimelides, who fortified the city ca. 365 B.C. The poros wall was 1.5 m thick and 2 km long. In the 2d c. B.C. Koroni was either autonomous (191) or associated with the Achaean League or Sparta. The earliest known coins of the city with the head of Athena and the inscription ACHAION KORONAION date from this period.
   On the acropolis hill and outside of the village have been found the foundations of the fortification wall and of various buildings, as well as sarcophagi, inscriptions, and sculptures. Classical remains have been found especially on the NE side of the acropolis, including five Doric capitals possibly belonging to a small temple of Early Classical date. Near the village were ruins of baths and an aqueduct, and 10 km to the NW are remains of Roman baths. On the acropolis in Pausanias' lifetime there was a bronze statue of Athena holding a bird. There was a bronze statue of Zeus the Savior in the agora, and temples of Artemis Paidotrophos (Children's nurse), of Dionysos and Asklepios, with marble statues of Dionysos and Asklepios.

G. S. Korres, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Sep 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Methone

METHONI (Ancient city) MESSINIA
Methone (Mothone, Modon) Messenia, Greece. A town on the site of Homeric Pedasos at the SW tip of the Messenian peninsula. A mole, first built in the 2d c. A.D., reinforced the bar which runs out to the rocky islet of Mothon and protects the natural harbor; the islet is now occupied by the ruins of a mediaeval fort. There are ancient blocks in the town wall on the side toward the harbor as well as in the foundation of the bridge which provides the only approach from the land side. The acropolis was more than 2 km to the E. Pausanias reported seeing a Temple of Athena Anemotis and a Shrine of Artemis, as well as a spring of water mixed with pitch, but none of these has been identified. Marble fragments and coins from the area attest to the continued existence of the town and its status as a free city in the time of Trajan. In 1962, some of the many wrecks off Methone were investigated by underwater archaeologists; the material brought up by the divers was taken to the Pylos museum.

M. H. McAllister, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Sep 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains 8 image(s), bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Kandianika

NEA KORONI (Village) EPIA
  About 80 stadia from ancient Koroni (at Petalidi, cf. p. 463) was located (Paus. 4.34.7) the ancient Sanctuary of Apollo Kory(n)thos, where two cult statues of the god were displayed. During the excavations of Versakis, which were held N of the Kandianika village, a part of this sanctuary was discovered. The cult of Apollo started during the early archaic period and continued until the end of the Roman era. Four temples were built, of which the 3d (g) peripteral with 6 x 12 columns dating back to the archaic period was erected on the spot of the 1st (d). The 4th (a), built close to the 2d (b), during the Hellenistic period, survived through the Roman period. There was a guesthouse and, at least during the Roman period, a triclinium. On the site of the 3d temple was built an Early Christian basilica and later the St. Andreas Church.
  Among the bronze finds of the sanctuary should be mentioned archaic and Classical idols (one depicting a hoplite), and especially swords and spear-butts with engraved dedications to Athena and Apollo (Apollo may originally have been worshiped as a warlike god, though later he was greatly honored as healer of diseases).

G. S. Korres, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Sphakteria

SFAKTIRIA (Small island) PYLOS
  An island off shore from the Bay of Navarino. It belonged to Sparta after the second Messenian war. In 425 B.C. during the Peloponnesian war it was the site of the famous battle that ended with the Athenian capture of 400 Spartans who had landed on the island. The remains of the ancient fort in which the Spartans sought refuge (Thuc. 4.31.2), on the mountain of Haghios Elias in the N section of the island, which have been visited and described by many scholars, are no longer easily recognizable. They were destroyed by military installations during WW II.

M. G. Picozzi, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains 7 image(s), bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


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