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The delta of Nestos River lies in the south boundaries of Kavala district and Xanthi district. The delta begins at the point where the river exits the massifs of Rodope in Toxotes and spreads to the south covering quite a large area (125,000 acres) from Nea Karvali to Avdera (coastline length: 50 km).It is one of the most important habitats in Greece and Europe due to its size as well as morphological variety, which includes lagoons, sand dunes, reedy areas, the riverside forest of Kotza Orman, small lakes, poplar-tree cultivations and marram grass areas especially near the banks at the estuary of Nestos. Among the water habitats formulating the mosaic of the delta of Nestos the most significant ones are the lagoons of Vassova, Erateino, Ayiasma, Kokala, Chaideftou, Keramoti, Monastiraki, Mangana. The delta of Nestos is protected by the Ramsar Treaty


Nestos river

  Nestos is one of the most important rivers in Greece. It has its sources in Mt Rila (S.Bulgaria) between the mountain ranges of Aimos and Rodope. The total length of Nestos is 234 km, 140 km of which are within Greece. The climatic conditions, land morphology and the presence of water have made it possible for various habitat types to be developed, accommodating over 150 animal species. The variety of habitat types and flora and fauna species found here is not met anywhere else in Europe. Bears, wolves, wild goats, deer, jackals, wild boars, foxes, wild cats, roes, grouse, vultures, trout live here. As far as vegetation is concerned, fir-trees, birch-trees, pine-trees, bushes, blackberry and raspberry bushes, orchids and the famous Rodope lily are among the species found here.
  Nestos River winds through the massifs of South Rodope. Due to its biodiversity (steep slopes with altitude variations, caves, geological background) the area accommodates rare species such as black alders, wild arbutus, planes, poplars, anemones, wild carnations etc. In the caves of the district there are not only bats but also golden eagles, martins, mourning doves etc.
The delta of Nestos River lies in the south boundaries of Kavala district and Xanthi district. The delta begins at the point where the river exits the massifs of Rodope in Toxotes and spreads to the south covering quite a large area (125,000 acres) from Nea Karvali to Avdera (coastline length: 50 km).It is one of the most important habitats in Greece and Europe due to its size as well as morphological variety, which includes lagoons, sand dunes, reedy areas, the riverside forest of Kotza Orman, small lakes, poplar-tree cultivations and marram grass areas especially near the banks at the estuary of Nestos. Among the water habitats formulating the mosaic of the delta of Nestos the most significant ones are the lagoons of Vassova, Erateino, Ayiasma, Kokala, Chaideftou, Keramoti, Monastiraki, Mangana. The delta of Nestos is protected by the Ramsar Treaty.

This text is cited January 2005 from the Prefecture of Xanthi URL below.


Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

Nestus

(Nestos), sometimes Nessus. A river in Thrace, rising in Mount Rhodope, and falling into the Aegean Sea opposite the island of Thasos. The Nestus formed the eastern boundary of Macedonia from the time of Philip and Alexander the Great.


Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Nestus

  Nestus or Nessus (Nestos, Scyl. pp. 8, 29; Scymn. 672; Pomp. Mela, ii. 2. §§ 2, 9; Plin. iv. 11, viii. 16; Nessos, Hesiod. Theog. 341; Ptol. iii. 12. § 2, iii. 13. § 7; Mestos, Zonar. ix. 28: Nesto, Turkish Karasu), the river which constituted the boundary of Thrace and Macedonia in the time of Philip and Alexander, an arrangement which the Romans continued on their conquest of the latter country. (Strab. vii. p. 331; Liv. xlv. 29.) Thucydides (ii. 96) states that it took its rise in Mt. Scomius, whence the Hebrus descended; being, in fact, that cluster of great summits between Ghiustendil and Sofia, which sends tributaries to all the great rivers of the N. of European Turkey. It discharged itself into the sea near Abdera. (Herod. vii. 109; comp. Theophrast. H. P. iii. 2; Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. p. 215.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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