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Listed 4 sub titles with search on: Information about the place for destination: "EVROS River MAKEDONIA EAST & THRACE".


Information about the place (4)

Columbia Encyclopedia

Local government WebPages

Evros River

The river Evros has its sources in Rila, the ancient Skomio, which close to the Bulgarian capitol Sofia. The river is floating to the southeast and is the natural border between Greece- Bulgaria and Turkey. According to the mythology the ancient name of the river was Romvos. The river got its new name after the drowning of Evros who was the son of the Thracian king Kassandros. Evros jumped into the river and drowned because he was disappointed by his father’s behavior, who didn’t believe Evros when he told him that his step mother, the kings wife, wanted his love and he refused it.
For many centuries the river remains the crossroad between east and west, north and south, Europe and Asia providing vital areas to the birds on their long journey. A magical scenario, where the sea embraced with land in a never-ending dance is forming little islands, lakes, swamps and lagoons. A rich area blessed but also cruel.

This extract is cited Sept 2003 from the Development Company of Alexandroupolis URL below, which contains images.


Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

Hebrus

   (Hebros). The modern Maritza; the principal river in Thrace, rising in the mountains of Scomius and Rhodope, and falling into the Aegaean Sea near Aenos, after forming by another branch an estuary called Stentoris Lacus. The Hebrus was celebrated in Greek legends. On its banks Orpheus was torn to pieces by the Thracian women; and it is frequently mentioned in connection with the worship of Dionysus.

This text is cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Hebrus

  Hebrus (Hebros: Maritza), the principal river of Thrace, has its sources near the point where mount Scomius joins mount Rhodope, in the northwestern corner of Thrace. Its course at first has a south-eastern direction; but below Adrianopolis it takes a south-western turn, and continues to flow in that direction until it reaches the Aegaean near Aenos. (Thucyd. ii. 96; Plin. iv. 18; Aristot. Meteor. i. 13.) The tributaries of the Hebrus are so numerous and important, that it becomes navigable even at Philippolis, while near its mouth it becomes really a large river. (Herod. vii. 59.) Near its mouth it divides itself into two branches, the eastern one of which forms lake Stentoris. (Herod. vii. 58; Acropolita, p. 64.) The most important among its tributaries are the Suemus, Arda, Artiscus, Tonsus, and Agrianes. About Adrianople the basin of the Hebrus is very extensive; but south of that city it becomes narrower, the mountains on both sides approaching more closely to the river. During the winter the Hebrus is sometimes frozen over. (Comp. Herod. iv. 90; Polyb. xxxiv. 13; Eurip. Here. Fur. 386; Strab. vii. pp. 322, 329, xiii. p. 590; Ptol. iii. 11. § 2; Arrian, Anab. i. 11; Mela, ii. 2; Virg. Eel. x. 65, Georg. iv. 463, 524; Val. Flac. ii. 515, iv. 463, viii. 228.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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