Olympic games ROME (Town) LAZIO - GTP - Greek Travel Pages

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Listed 9 sub titles with search on: Olympic games  for wider area of: "ROME Town LAZIO" .


Olympic games (9)

Ancient olympic champions, event unknown

Gnaeus Marcius

ROME (Ancient city) ITALY
, , 5
Equestrian competition, two times winner: 196th & 197th Olympiads, 5 & 9 A.D.

Ancient olympic champions, four-horse chariot

Tiberius Cladius Nero

, , -4
4 B.C., 194th Olympiad.

Germanicus Caesar Tiberius

, , 17
17 A.D., 199th Olympiad.

Ancient olympic champions, long-race

Gaius, 72 B.C., 177th Olympiad

, , -72

Ancient olympic champions, multiple victories

Nero the Emperor, 65 A.D., 211st Olympiad

, , 65

Modern Olympic Games

Rome 1960

ROME (Town) LAZIO
   The Eternal City opens its gates widely to receive the 1960 Olympics. These are the Games that all the experts prognosed sure victories for German and Soviet women runners. The surprise, though, came from Tennessee with the American Black Antilope, Wilma Rudolph.
   Wilma, the 19th child, out of a total of 22, was a shy, lean and a good student girl. One morning, while reciting a poem in class, she fell on the floor. The diagnosis that came later was paralysis due to polio. One more statistic number added to the thousands the world - and especially the U.S. - was suffering daily. A few months later, the doctors applied metal supporters around her knees and ankles. But Wilma was made after the recipe that rare people are made. She convinced her father to free her from the supporters. In the months that followed she devised a series of exercises. She'd grab a chair, pull herself up, she'd stand still. Then she'd try a few steps. Within six months she could walk a few times around her room. And next year she could half-run a few times around the forest across her house. Faster. And faster. And again. And again.
   Now, in Rome, she made the German and the Soviet girls see the rivalry coming from the American South. She won three golds. But her actual victory was against polio. She became a symbol of hope for millions of children all over the world.
   Rome gave the world another star as well. That was Cassius Clay, later known as Muhammad Ali, who won the gold for the light-heavyweight boxing event. Ali became a professional right after the Games and he is the only athlete in the world to have amassed the greatest amount ever earned by a sportsman. His earnings are estimated today to have passed the $96 million mark!
   Rome gives us her tragic note due to steroids. Danish cyclist Knut Jensen collapsed to death and while, originally, there was a diagnosis stating excessive heat during the race, there was a later statement that verified an overdose of drugs...

Text by Dimitri N. Marcopoulos   The Eternal City opens its gates widely to receive the 1960 Olympics. These are the Games that all the experts prognosed sure victories for German and Soviet women runners. The surprise, though, came from Tennessee with the American Black Antilope, Wilma Rudolph.
   Wilma, the 19th child, out of a total of 22, was a shy, lean and a good student girl. One morning, while reciting a poem in class, she fell on the floor. The diagnosis that came later was paralysis due to polio. One more statistic number added to the thousands the world - and especially the U.S. - was suffering daily. A few months later, the doctors applied metal supporters around her knees and ankles. But Wilma was made after the recipe that rare people are made. She convinced her father to free her from the supporters. In the months that followed she devised a series of exercises. She'd grab a chair, pull herself up, she'd stand still. Then she'd try a few steps. Within six months she could walk a few times around her room. And next year she could half-run a few times around the forest across her house. Faster. And faster. And again. And again.
   Now, in Rome, she made the German and the Soviet girls see the rivalry coming from the American South. She won three golds. But her actual victory was against polio. She became a symbol of hope for millions of children all over the world.
   Rome gave the world another star as well. That was Cassius Clay, later known as Muhammad Ali, who won the gold for the light-heavyweight boxing event. Ali became a professional right after the Games and he is the only athlete in the world to have amassed the greatest amount ever earned by a sportsman. His earnings are estimated today to have passed the $96 million mark!
   Rome gives us her tragic note due to steroids. Danish cyclist Knut Jensen collapsed to death and while, originally, there was a diagnosis stating excessive heat during the race, there was a later statement that verified an overdose of drugs...

Text by Dimitri N. Marcopoulos   The Eternal City opens its gates widely to receive the 1960 Olympics. These are the Games that all the experts prognosed sure victories for German and Soviet women runners. The surprise, though, came from Tennessee with the American Black Antilope, Wilma Rudolph.
   Wilma, the 19th child, out of a total of 22, was a shy, lean and a good student girl. One morning, while reciting a poem in class, she fell on the floor. The diagnosis that came later was paralysis due to polio. One more statistic number added to the thousands the world - and especially the U.S. - was suffering daily. A few months later, the doctors applied metal supporters around her knees and ankles. But Wilma was made after the recipe that rare people are made. She convinced her father to free her from the supporters. In the months that followed she devised a series of exercises. She'd grab a chair, pull herself up, she'd stand still. Then she'd try a few steps. Within six months she could walk a few times around her room. And next year she could half-run a few times around the forest across her house. Faster. And faster. And again. And again.
   Now, in Rome, she made the German and the Soviet girls see the rivalry coming from the American South. She won three golds. But her actual victory was against polio. She became a symbol of hope for millions of children all over the world.
   Rome gave the world another star as well. That was Cassius Clay, later known as Muhammad Ali, who won the gold for the light-heavyweight boxing event. Ali became a professional right after the Games and he is the only athlete in the world to have amassed the greatest amount ever earned by a sportsman. His earnings are estimated today to have passed the $96 million mark!
   Rome gives us her tragic note due to steroids. Danish cyclist Knut Jensen collapsed to death and while, originally, there was a diagnosis stating excessive heat during the race, there was a later statement that verified an overdose of drugs...

Text by Dimitri N. Marcopoulos

Rome 1960

Links with various Organizations' WebPages:
The Olympic Movement
American Sport Art Museum and Archives , a division of the United States Sports Academy
International Sailing Federation

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