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Listed 100 (total found 127) sub titles with search on: Mythology for wider area of: "ILIA Prefecture WEST GREECE" .


Mythology (127)

Ancient myths

ALFIOS (River) ILIA

Alpheus and Arethusa

There is another legend about the Alpheius. They say that there was a hunter called Alpheius, who fell in love with Arethusa, who was herself a huntress. Arethusa, unwilling to marry crossed, they say, to the island opposite Syracuse called Ortygia, and there turned from a woman to a spring. Alpheius too was changed by his love into the river. This account of Alpheius...to Ortygia. But that the Alpheius passes through the sea and mingles his waters with the spring at this place I cannot disbelieve, as I know that the god at Delphi confirms the story. For this reason, therefore, because the water of the Alpheius mingles with the Arethusa, I am convinced that the legend arose of the river's love-affair.


EFYRA ILIAKI (Ancient city) ILIA

The Fifth Labor of Heracles - The Augean Stables

  For the fifth labor, Eurystheus ordered Hercules to clean up King Augeas' stables. Hercules knew this job would mean getting dirty and smelly, but sometimes even a hero has to do these things. Then Eurystheus made Hercules' task even harder: he had to clean up after the cattle of Augeas in a single day.
  For the fifth labor, Eurystheus ordered Hercules to clean up King Augeas' stables. Hercules knew this job would mean getting dirty and smelly, but sometimes even a hero has to do these things. Then Eurystheus made Hercules' task even harder: he had to clean up after the cattle of Augeas in a single day.
  Every night the cowherds, goatherds and shepherds drove the thousands of animals to the stables. Every night the cowherds, goatherds and shepherds drove the thousands of animals to the stables.
  Hercules went to King Augeas, and without telling anything about Eurystheus, said that he would clean out the stables in one day, if Augeas would give him a tenth of his fine cattle. Augeas couldn't believe his ears, but promised. Hercules brought Augeas's son along to watch. First the hero tore a big opening in the wall of the cattle-yard where the stables were. Then he made another opening in the wall on the opposite side of the yard.
Next, he dug wide trenches to two rivers which flowed nearby. He turned the course of the rivers into the yard. The rivers rushed through the stables, flushing them out, and all the mess flowed out the hole in the wall on other side of the yard.
   When Augeas learned that Eurystheus was behind all this, he would not pay Hercules his reward. Not only that, he denied that he had even promised to pay a reward. Augeas said that if Hercules didn't like it, he could take the matter to a judge to decide.
 The judge took his seat. Hercules called the son of Augeas to testify. The boy swore that his father had agreed to give Hercules a reward. The judge ruled that Hercules would have to be paid. In a rage, Augeas ordered both his own son and Hercules to leave his kingdom at once. So the boy went to the north country to live with his aunts, and Hercules headed back to Mycenae. But Eurystheus said that this labour didn't count, because Hercules was paid for having done the work.

This text is cited July 2004 from Perseus Project URL bellow, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Eleius had a son Augeas. This Augeas had so many cattle and flocks of goats that actually most of his land remained untilled because of the dung of the animals. Now he persuaded Heracles to cleanse for him the land from dung, either in return for a part of Elis or possibly for some other reward. Heracles accomplished this feat too, turning aside the stream of the Menius into the dung. But, because Heracles had accomplished his task by cunning, without toil, Augeas refused to give him his reward, and banished Phyleus, the elder of his two sons, for objecting that he was wronging a man who had been his benefactor.


Heracles. 5. The stables of Augeas. Eurystheus imposed upon Heracles the task of cleaning the stables of Augeas in one day. Augeas was king of Elis, and extremely rich in cattle. Heracles, without mentioning the command of Eurystheus, went to Augeas, offering in one day to clean his stables, if he would give him the tenth part of the cattle for his trouble, or, according to Pausanias (v. i.7) a part of his territory. Augeas, believing that Heracles could not possibly accomplish what he promised, agreed, and Heracles took Phyleus, the son of Augeas, as his witness, and then led the rivers Alpheius and Peneius through the stables, which were thus cleaned in the time fixed upon. But Augeas, who learned that Heracles had undertaken the work by the command of Eurystheus, refused the reward, denied his promise, and declared that he would have the matter decided by a judicial verdict. Phyleus then bore witness against his father, who exiled him from Elis. Eurystheus declared the work thus performed to be unlawful, because Heracles had stipulated with Augeas a payment for it. (Apollod. ii. 5.5; Theocrit. xxv. 88, &c.; Ptolem. Heph. 5; Athen. x.; Schol. ad Pind. Ol. xi. 42.) At a subsequent time Hferacles, to revenge the faithlessness of Augeas, marched with an army of Argives and Tirynthians against Augeas, but in a narrow defile in Elis he was taken by surprise by Cteatus and Eurytus, and lost a great number of his warriors. But afterwards Heracles slew Cteatus and Eurytus, invaded Elis, and killed Augeas and his sons. After this victory, Heracles marked out the sacred ground on which the Olympian games were to be celebrated, built altars, and instituted the Olympian festival and games. (Apollod. ii. 7.2; Paus. v. 1.7. 3.1, &c., 4.1; viii. 15.2; Pind. Ol. xi. 25, &c., comp. v. 5, iii. 13, &c.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Nov 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


ILIA (Ancient country) GREECE

Endymion & Selene

Endymion, (Endumion). In Greek mythology, the beautiful son of Aethlius (or, according to another story, of Zeus) and Calyce, daughter of Aeolus, king of Elis, father of Epeus, Aetolus, and Paeon, the first of whom won the government of the country by conquering in a race which his father had set on foot. He was loved by Selene, the moon-goddess, by whom he had fifty daughters. They were supposed to symbolize the fifty lunar months which intervened between the Olympic Games. His grave was at Olympia. Another story made him a shepherd or hunter on Mount Latmos in Caria. Zeus bestowed on him eternal youth and eternal life in the form of unbroken slumber. Selene descended every night from heaven to visit and embrace the beautiful sleeper in his grotto. The usual story, however, makes Selene to have thrown him into a sleep so that she might kiss and caress him without his knowledge. A beautiful statue in the British Museum represents Endymion, and the legend inspired Keats to write one of the most exquisite poems in English literature.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks



Endymion (Endumion), a youth distinguished for his beauty, and renowned in ancient story by the perpetual sleep in which he spent his life. Some traditions about Endymion refer us to Elis, and others to Caria, and others again are a combination of the two. According to the first set of legends, he was a son of Aethlius and Calyce,or of Zeus and Calyce, and succeeded Aethlius in the kingdom of Elis (Paus. v. 1.2). Others again say that he expelled Clymenus from the kingdom of Elis, and introduced into the country Aeolian settlers from Thessaly (Apollod. i. 7.5, &c.; Paus. v. 8.1). Conon (Narrat 14) calls him a son of Zeus and Protogencia, and Hyginus (Fab. 271) a son of Aetolus. He is said to have been married to Asterodia, Chromia, Hyperippe, Neis, or Iphianassa; and Aetolus, Paeon, Epeius. Eurydice, and Naxus are called his children. He was, however, especially beloved by Selene, by whom he had fifty daughters (Paus. v. 1.2). He caused his sons to engage in the race-course at Olympia, and promised to the victor the succession in his kingdom, and Epeius conquered his brothers, and succeeded Endymion as king of Elis. He was believed to be buried at Olympia, which also contained a statue of his in the treasury of the Metapontians (Paus. vi. 19.8, 20.6). According to a tradition, believed at Heracleia in Caria, Endymion had come from Elis to mount Latmus in Caria, whence he is called the Latmian (Latmius; Paus. v. 1. § 4; Ov. Ars Am. iii. 83, Trist. ii. 299). He is described by the poets either as a king, a shepherd, or a hunter (Theocrit. iii. 49, xx. 37 with the Scholiast), and while he was slumbering in a cave of mount Latmus, Selene came down to him, kissed, and lay by his side (Comp. Apollon. Rhod. iv. 57). There also he had, in later times, a sanctuary, and his tomb was shewn in a cave of mount Latmus (Paus. v. 1.4; Strab. xiv.). His eternal sleep on Latmus is assigned to different causes in ancient story. Some said that Zeus had granted him a request, and that Endymion begged for immortality, eternal sleep, and everlasting youth (Apollod. i. 7.5.); others relate that he was received among the gods of Olympus, but as he there fell in love with Hera, Zeus, in his anger, punished him by throwing him into eternal sleep on mount Latmus (Schol. ad Theocrit. iii. 49). Others, lastly, state that Selene, charmed with his surpassing beauty, sent him to sleep, that she might be able to kiss him without being observed by him (Cic. Tuscal. i. 38). The stories of the fair sleeper, Endymion, the darling of Selene, are unquestionably poetical fictions, in which sleep is personified. His name and all his attributes confirm this opinion : Endymion signifies a being that gently comes over one; he is called a king, because he has power over all living creatures; a shepherd, because he slumbered in the cool caves of mount Latmus, that is, "the mount of oblivion". Nothing can be more beautiful, lastly, than the notion, that he is kissed by the soft rays of the moon (Comp. Plat. Phaed.; Ov. Am. i. 13. 43). There is a beautiful statue of a sleeping Endymion in the British Museum.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Dec 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Endymion, on Pausanias:
  The first to rule in this land, they say, was Aethlius, who was the son of Zeus and of Protogeneia, the daughter of Deucalion, and the father of Endymion. The Moon, they say, fell in love with this Endymion and bore him fifty daughters. Others with greater probability say that Endymion took a wife Asterodia--others say she was Cromia, the daughter of Itonus, the son of Amphictyon; others again, Hyperippe, the daughter of Arcas--but all agree that Endymion begat Paeon, Epeius, Aetolus, and also a daughter Eurycyda. Endymion set his sons to run a race at Olympia for the throne; Epeius won, and obtained the kingdom, and his subjects were then named Epeans for the first time.(Paus. 5.1.4)
...Later on there (at Olympia) came (they say) from Crete Clymenus, the son of Cardys, about fifty years after the flood came upon the Greeks in the time of Deucalion. He was descended from Heracles of Ida; he held the games at Olympia and set up an altar in honor of Heracles, his ancestor, and the other Curetes, giving to Heracles the surname of Parastates (Assistant). And Endymion, the son of Aethlius, deposed Clymenus, and set his sons a race in Olympia with the kingdom as the prize. (Paus. 5.8.1)
... At the end of the stadium (at Olympia), where is the starting-place for the runners, there is, the Eleans say, the tomb of Endymion. (Paus. 6.20.9)

Endymion, on Apollodorus:
Calyce and Aethlius had a son Endymion who led Aeolians from Thessaly and founded Elis. But some say that he was a son of Zeus. As he was of surpassing beauty, the Moon fell in love with him, and Zeus allowed him to choose what he would, and he chose to sleep for ever, remaining deathless and ageless.
Endymion had by a Naiad nymph or, as some say, by Iphianassa, a son Aetolus, who slew Apis, son of Phoroneus, and fled to the Curetian country. There he killed his hosts, Dorus and Laodocus and Polypoetes, the sons of Phthia and Apollo, and called the country Aetolia after himself.( Apollod. 1.7.5-6)


Selene. The Greek goddess of the moon, daughter of the Titan Hyperion and Theia, sister of Helios and Eos. She was described as a beautiful woman with long wings and golden diadem, from which she shed a mild light, riding in a car drawn by two white horses or mules or cows. The horns of the latter symbolized the crescent moon. In later times she was identified with Artemis (or else with Hecate and Persephone), as was Helios with Phoebus Apollo, and therefore was herself called Phoebe. After this she was also regarded as a huntress and archer, recognizable by her crescent as the goddess of the moon. She was worshipped on the days of the new and full moon. She bore to Zeus a daughter, Pandia, worshipped at Athens with her father at the festival of Pandia. On her love for Endymion, see Endymion. The Romans called her Luna, and had two temples to her at Rome--one on the Aventine and one on the Palatine.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


OLYMPIA (Ancient sanctuary) ILIA

History of Ancient Olympia

In the western Peloponnese, in a peaceful, idyllic valley, between Kronos Hill and the confluence of the rivers Alpheios and Kladeos, there flourished in ancient times one of the most important pan Hellenic sanctuaries: the Sanctuary of Olympia. At this Sanctuary, apart from rituals performed for healing, games called Olympic were also established from a very early period and, with the passage of time, attracted the attention of all the Greeks. With the Olympic Games, the ideal of noble rivalry found its complete expression and for many centuries forged the unity and peace of the Greek world. Hence the Sanctuary where they took place was recognized as one of the greatest pan Hellenic centers.

THE LEGEND

It has not yet been established when people first began worshipping at Olympia. However, archaeological finds show that the area was at least settled from the 3rd millennium B.C. it is also known that the first Sanctuary was the Gainon, which was found at the foot of Kronos hill and was dedicated to Geia (Earth), the wife of Ouranos (Heaven). That was also it is said, the most ancient oracle of Olympia (Pausanias V, 14, 10).
Later, Kronos - the youngest son of Geia and Ouranos - having deposed his father, was worshipped at Olympia with his wife, Rhea. According to Pausanias (V, 7 ,6) the people of that time, who were also called the people of the golden age, built a shrine to Kronos at Olympia. Besides, on the summit of Kronos Hill, which took this name from Kronos, there was on altar to the god, where the so-called "Basilai" every year made sacrifices in his honour (Pausanias VI, 20, 1).
In the course of the centuries came new gods. According to myth, Kronos swallowed his male children fearing that they might depose him, as he had deposed Ouranos. He has devoured two children, Poseidon and Hades, when Zeus was born. Then Rhea, having given Kronos a stone bound in swaddling clothes to swallow, handed the newborn child to five Cretan brothers, the Daktyloi of Isa or Kouretes, to conceal him and bring him up in Crete. When Zeus came of age, he asked Metis for help to overthrow Kronos. Metis gave Kronos some medicine to drink and so made him vomit the two children whom he had devoured. Then Zeus helped by his two brothers and three sisters. Hera, Hestia and Demeter, deposed Kronos after a terrible conflict lasting ten years, which is know as the Titanomachia (Battle between the Gods and the Titans).
Since the Olympian gods prevailed, from then on the Sanctuary of Olympia became positively the Sanctuary of Zeus. So in a series of local myths Zeus was associated with Olympia and the Games. One of these local myths says that the five Cretan brothers, the Kouretes, to whom Rhea had entrusted his guardianship, came from Crete to Olympia, where Zeus was weaned on the milk of Amalthea by the nymphs. At Olympia, the eldest of the five brothers, Hercules - not Hercules the son of Amphitrion and Alkmene- arranged foot races among his brothers and honored the winner with a crown of wild olive, which grew abundantly in the valley. Even Hercules called these games "Olympic" and appointed that they should take place every fifth year, since he and his brothers numbered five (Pausanias V,7, 6-9).
Other local myths also say that Zeus fought with Kronos at Olympia usurping the leadership and that he himself established the games because he overcame Kronos. It is also said that other gods competed at Olympia and that Apollo beat Ares at Boxing and outran Hermes (Pausanias V, 7, 10).
According to tradition Aethlios, the first king of Elis was also an organiser of the games. Aethlios was succeeded by his son Endymion, who in turn organised races at Olympia among his sons Paeon, Aetolus and Epeios, in order to leave his kingdom to the winner. Pelops too, after he beat King Oinomaos of Pisa in a chariot race and married the King's daughter Hippodameia, once again arranged at Olympia games in honor of Zeus, which it was said were the most memorable of all those which had been celebrated up till then.
When Augeias reigned over Elis, Hercules- son of Amhitrion and Alkmene- came to clean his stables. After the contest however, Augeias refused to give Hercules the cattle, which he had promised. Then Hercules marched against Augeias, and after conquering Elis, he arranged games at Olympia in honour of Zeus. At these games it is said that he himself was distinguished in Wrestling and in the Pankration. Finally, games at Olympia were also arranged by Oxylos, the King of Elis. After the reign of Oxylos however, the games were forgotten until the time of Iphitos, the great King of Elis (Pausanisas V, 8, 1-5).
Spiros Foteinos, ed.; Cited August 2002 from the Municipality of Olympia URL bellow, which contains images.


The first Olympic Games

Heracles, being the eldest, matched his brothers, as a game, in a running-race, and crowned the winner with a branch of wild olive. Heracles of Ida, therefore, has the reputation of being the first to have held, on the occasion I mentioned, the games, and to have called them Olympic. So he established the custom of holding them every fifth year, because he and his brothers were five in number. Now some say that Zeus wrestled here with Cronus himself for the throne, while others say that he held the games in honor of his victory over Cronus. The record of victors include Apollo, who outran Hermes and beat Ares at boxing. It is for this reason, they say, that the Pythian flute-song is played while the competitors in the pentathlum are jumping; for the flute-song is sacred to Apollo, and Apollo won Olympic victories.


SAMIKON (Ancient city) ILIA

Rhadine

   One poem entitled Rhadine (of which Stesichorus is reputed to be the author), which begins, "Come, thou clear-voiced Muse, Erato, begin thy song, voicing to the tune of thy lovely lyre the strain of the children of Samus," refers to the children of the Samus in question; for Rhadine, who had been betrothed to a tyrant of Corinth, the author says, set sail from Samus (not meaning, of course, the Ionian Samus) while the west wind was blowing, and with the same wind her brother, he adds, went to Delphi as chief of an embassy; and her cousin, who was in love with her, set out for Corinth in his chariot to visit her. And the tyrant killed them both and sent their bodies away on a chariot, but repented, recalled the chariot, and buried their bodies.


Colonizations by the inhabitants

MAKISTOS (Ancient city) ILIA

Eretria colonized by Eretrieus of Macistus

As for Eretria, some say that it was colonized from Triphylian Macistus by Eretrieus, but others say from the Eretria at Athens, which now is a marketplace.


Constellations

ALFIOS (River) ILIA

Eponymous founders or settlers

ALIFIRA (Ancient city) ILIA

Alipherus

Alipherus or Halipherus (Alipheros), one of the sons of Lycaon, killed by Zeus with a flash of lightning for their insolence. (Apollod. iii. 8. § 1.) The town of Aliphera or Alipheira in Arcadia was believed to have been founded by him, and to have derived its name from him. (Paus. viii. 3.1, 26.4; Steph. Byz. s. v. Alipheira.)


DYSPONTION (Ancient city) PYRGOS

Dysponteus

Son of Oenomaus, founder of Dyspontium.


Dysponteus or Dysponteus (Dusponteus or Duspontios), according to Pausanias (vi. 22.6), a son of Oenomaus, but according to Stephanus of Byzantium (s. v. Duspontion), a son of Pelops, was believed to be the founder of the town of Dyspontium, in Pisatis.


LEPREON (Ancient city) ILIA

Lepreus

Son of Pyrgeus, challenges Herakles to eating-match, killed by Herakles.


Leprea

Leprea, a daughter of Pyrgeus, from whom the town of Lepreum, in the south of Elis, was said to have derived its name (Paus. v. 5.4). Another tradition derived the name from Lepreus, a son of Caucon, Glaucon, or Pyrgeus (Aelian, V. H. i. 24; Paus. v. 5.4), by Astydameia. He was a grandson of Poseidon (the Schol. ad Callim. Hymn. in Jov. 39, calls him a son of Poseidon), and a rival of Heracles both in his strength and his powers of eating, but he was conquered and slain by him. His tomb was believed to exist at Phigalia. (Athen. x.; Paus. l. c.; Eustath. ad Hom.)


LETRINI (Ancient city) PYRGOS

Letreus

Son of Pelops, founds Letrini. (Paus. 6.22.8)


PISSA (Ancient city) ANCIENT OLYMPIA

Pisus

The founder of the city, they say, was Pisus, the son of Perieres, the son of Aeolus. (Paus. 6.22.2)


PYLOS ILIAS (Ancient city) ILIA

Pylon or Pylas

Retires to Peloponnese, founds Pylos.


Famous robbers

PISSATIS (Ancient area) ILIA

Saurus

A robber, slain by Herakles, his tomb, ridge of Saurus.


First ancestors

EPII LAND (Ancient country) ILIA

Epeus (Epeios) and Anaxiroe

Perseus Encyclopedia


Epeus, (Epeios). Son of Endymion, king of Elis. From him the Epei derived their name.


Founders

ARINI (Ancient city) ILIA

Aphareus & Arene

Aphareus: Son of Perieres, king of Messenia, founds Arene, receives Tyndareus and Neleus, father of Idas and Lynceus and Pisus, his sons slain by Dioscuri and not buried at Sparta, tomb of A. at Sparta, A. and his children invoked as heroes by Messenians, their portraits. Arene: Daughter of Oebalus, half-sister and wife of Aphareus.


Aphareus, a son of the Messenian king Perieres and Gorgophone, the daughter of Perseus (Apollod. i. 9.5). His wife is called by Apollodorus (iii. 10.3) Arene, and by others Polydora or Laocoossa (Schol. ad Apollon. Rhod. i. 152; Theocrit. xxii. 106). Aphareus had three sons, Lynceus, Idas, and Peisus. He was believed to have founded the town of Arene in Messenia, which he called after his wife. He received Neleus and Lycus, the son of Pandion, who had fled from their countries into his dominions. To the former he assigned a tract of land in Messenia, and from the latter he and his family learned the orgies of the great gods (Paus. iv. 2.3, &c.). Pausanias in this passage mentions only the two sons of Aphareus, Idas and Lynceus, who are celebrated in ancient story under the name of Apharetidai or Apharetiadai, for their fight with the Dioscuri, which is described by Pindar (Nem. x. 111, &c.). Two other mythical personages of this name occur in Hom. Il. xiii. 541; Ov. Met. xii. 341.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Laocoosa

Laocoosa (Laokoosa), the wife of Aphareus, and mother of Idas. (Theocrit. xxii. 206; comp. Apollod. iii. 10. Β§ 3, who, however, calls the mother of Idas Arene.)


ARPINA (Ancient city) ANCIENT OLYMPIA

Oenomaus (Oinomaos)

Founds city of Harpina.


YRMINI (Ancient city) ILIA

Actor

Brother of Augeas, father of Eurytus and Cteatus named Molionides after their mother Moline, share kingdom of Elis, marry daughters of Dexamenus, defeat Herakles, murdered by Herakles.


Gods & demigods

ALFIOS (River) ILIA

Demainetus

Demainetus, (Demainetos), a surname of Asclepius, derived from the name of a temple of his on the Alpheius. (Paus. vi. 21.4.)


ALIFIRA (Ancient city) ILIA

Zeus Lecheates

Lecheates i. e. the protector of childbed, a surname of Zeus, who, as the father of Athena, was worshipped under this name at Aliphera. (Paus. viii. 26.4)


BASSAE (Ancient sanctuary) ILIA

Epicurius Apollo

Epicurius, (Epikourios), the helper, a surname of Apollo, under which lie was worshipped at Bassae in Arcadia. Every year a wild boar was sacrificed to him in his temple on mount Lycaeus. He had received this surname because he had at one time delivered the country from a pestilence. (Paus. viii. 383.6, 41.5.)


FIGALIA (Ancient city) ILIA

Dionysus Acratophorus

Acratophorus (Akratophoros), a surname of Dionysus, by which he was designated as the giver of unmixed wine, and worshipped at Phigaleia in Arcadia. (Paus. viii. 39.4)


Artemis Eurynome

Eurynome. A surname of Artemis at Phigalea in Arcadia. Her sanctuary which was surrounded by cypresses, was opened only once in every year, and sacrifices were then offered to her. She was represented half woman and half fish. (Paus. viii. 41.4.) There are four more mythical personages of this name. (Hom. Od. xviii. 168; Apollod. iii. 9.2.)


FRIZA (Ancient city) SKILOUNTA

Athena Cydonia

Cydonia (Kudonia), a surname of Athena, under which she had a temple at Phrixa in Elis, which was said to have been built by Clymenus of Cydonia. (Paus. vi. 21.5)


ILIA (Ancient country) GREECE

Sosipolis

At the foot of Mount Cronius, on the north...is a sanctuary of Eileithyia, and in it Sosipolis, a native Elean deity, is worshipped. Now they surname Eileithyia Olympian, and choose a priestess for the goddess every year. The old woman who tends Sosipolis herself too by an Elean custom lives in chastity, bringing water for the god's bath and setting before him barley cakes kneaded with honey. In the front part of the temple, for it is built in two parts, is an altar of Eileithyia and an entrance for the public; in the inner Part Sosipolis is worshipped, and no one may enter it except the woman who tends the god, and she must wrap her head and face in a white veil. Maidens and matrons wait in the sanctuary of Eileithyia chanting a hymn; they burn all manner of incense to the god, but it is not the custom to pour libations of wine. An oath is taken by Sosipolis on the most important occasions. The story is that when the Arcadians had invaded the land of Elis, and the Eleans were set in array against them, a woman came to the Elean generals, holding a baby to her breast, who said that she was the mother of the child but that she gave him, because of dreams, to fight for the Eleans. The Elean officers believed that the woman was to be trusted, and placed the child before the army naked. When the Arcadians came on, the child turned at once into a snake. Thrown into disorder at the sight, the Arcadians turned and fled, and were attacked by the Eleans, who won a very famous victory, and so call the god Sosipolis. On the spot where after the battle the snake seemed to them to go into the ground they made the sanctuary. With him the Eleans resolved to worship Eileithyia also, because this goddess to help them brought her son forth unto men. The tomb of the Arcadians who were killed in the battle is on the hill across the Cladeus to the west. Near to the sanctuary of Eileithyia are the remains of the sanctuary of Heavenly Aphrodite, and there too they sacrifice upon the altars.

This extract is from: Pausanias. Description of Greece (ed. W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., & H.A. Ormerod, 1918). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


ILIS (Ancient city) ILIA

Apollo Acesius

Acesius (Akesios), a surname of Apollo, under which he was worshipped in Elis, where he had a splendid temple in the agora. This surname, which has the same meaning as akestor and alexikakos, characterised the god as the averter of evil. (Paus. vi. 24.5).


Hara Ammonia

Ammonia, a surname of Hara, under which she was worshipped in Elis. The inhabitants of Elis had from the earliest times been in the habit of consulting the oracle of Zeus Ammon in Libya. (Paus. v. 15.7)


Demeter Chamyne

Chamyne (Chamune), a surname of Demeter in Elis, which was derived either from the earth having opened (Chainein at that place to receive Pluto, or from one Chamynus, to whom the building of a temple of Demeter at Elis was ascribed. (Paus. vi. 21.1)


LAMBIA (Mountain) ILIA

Pan

The Erymanthus has its source in Mount Lampeia, which is said to be sacred to Pan.


   (Pan). The Greek god of flocks and shepherds, described as the son of the Arcadian shepherd deity Hermes and Dryops, by others as the son of Hermes and Penelope, and by still others as the offspring of Penelope by all the suitors. The Homeric hymn describes him as delighting all the gods, and thus getting his name. He was perfectly developed from his birth; and when his mother saw him she ran away through fear; but Hermes carried him to Olympus, where all the gods were delighted with him, especially Dionysus. He was originally only an Arcadian god; and Arcadia was always the principal seat of his worship. From this country his name and worship afterwards spread over other parts of Greece; but at Athens his worship was not introduced until the time of the battle of Marathon. In Arcadia he was the god of forests, pastures, flocks, and shepherds, and dwelt in grottoes, wandered on the summits of mountains and rocks, and in valleys, either amusing himself with the chase, or leading the dances of the nymphs. As the god of flocks, both of wild and tame animals, it was his province to increase and guard them; but he was also a hunter, and hunters owed their success or failure to him. The Arcadian hunters used to scourge the statue of the god if they had been disappointed in the chase. During the heat of midday he used to slumber, and was very indignant when any one disturbed him. As the god of flocks, bees also were under his protection, as well as the coast where fishermen carried on their pursuit. As the god of everything connected with pastoral life, he was fond of music, and the inventor of the syrinx or shepherd's flute, which he himself played in a masterly manner, and in which he instructed others also, such as Daphnis. He is thus said to have loved the poet Pindar, and to have sung and danced his lyric songs, in return for which Pindar erected a sanctuary to him in front of his house.
    Pan, like other gods who dwelt in forests, was dreaded by travellers, to whom he sometimes appeared, and whom he startled with sudden awe or terror. Thus, when Phidippides, the Athenian, was sent to Sparta to solicit its aid against the Persians, Pan accosted him, and promised to terrify the barbarians if the Athenians would worship him. Hence, sudden fright without any visible cause was ascribed to Pan, and was called a Panic fear (panikon deima). He is further said to have had a terrible voice, and by it to have frightened the Titans in their fight with the gods. It seems that this feature--namely, his fondness of noise and riot-- was the cause of his being considered the minister and companion of Cybele and Dionysus. He was at the same time believed to be possessed of prophetic powers, and to have even instructed Apollo in this art. While roaming in the forests, he fell in love with the nymph Echo, by whom, or by Pitho, he became the father of Iynx. His love of Syrinx, after whom he named his flute, is well known from Ovid. Fir-trees (pitues) were sacred to him, since the nymph Pitys, whom he loved, had been metamorphosed into that tree; and the sacrifices offered to him consisted of cows, rams, lambs, milk, and honey. Sacrifices were also offered to him in common with Dionysus and the nymphs. The various epithets which are given him by the poets refer either to his singular appearance, or are derived from the names of the places in which he was worshipped. The Romans identified with Pan their own god Inuus, and also Faunus, which name is merely another form of Pan. In works of art Pan is represented as a voluptuous and sensual being, with horns, snub-nose, and goat's feet, sometimes in the act of dancing, and sometimes playing on the syrinx. His attendant deities or demons were known as Panes or Panisci (Paniskoi). Famous representations of Pan in sculpture are the so-called Barberini Faun at Munich, the Dancing Pan at Naples, and the Pan (or Faun) of Praxiteles at Rome, which suggested to Hawthorne his famous romance, The Marble Faun. In English literature, besides this romance, Pan is the subject of Landor's Pan and Pitys, Cupid and Pan, Buchanan's Pan, Browning's Pan and Luna, and Swinburne's Pan and Thalassius.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


LEPREON (Ancient city) ILIA

Zeus Leucaeus

Leucaeus (Leukaios), a surname of Zeus, under which he was worshipped at Lepreus, in Elis. (Paus. v. 5.4)


LETRINI (Ancient city) PYRGOS

Artemis Alphaea, Alpheaea, or Aalpeiusa

Alphaea, Alpheaea, or Aalpeiusa (Alphaia, Alpheaia, or Alpheiousa, a surname of Artemis, which she derived from the river god Alpheius, who loved her, and under which she was worshipped at Letrini in Elis (Paus. vi. 22.5; Strab. viii.), and in Ortygia. (Schol. ad Pind. Pyth. ii. 12, Nem. i. 3).


MAKISTOS (Ancient city) ILIA

Heracles Macistus

Macistus (Makistos), a surname of Heracles, who had a temple in the neighbourhood of the town of Macistus in Triphylia. (Strab. viii.)


PISSA (Ancient city) ANCIENT OLYMPIA

Artemis Cordaca

Cordaca (Kordaka), a surname of Artemis in Elis, derived from an indecent dance called ko/rdac, which the companions of Pelops are said to have performed in honour of the goddess after a victory which they had won. (Paus. vi. 22.1)


Heroes

EPII LAND (Ancient country) ILIA

Degmenus

[...] but when the Epeians met them with arms, and it was found that the two forces were evenly matched, Pyraechmes the Aetolian and Degmenus the Epeian, in accordance with an ancient custom of the Greeks, advanced to single combat. Degmenus was lightly armed with a bow, thinking that he would easily overcome a heavy-armed opponent at long range, but Pyraechmes armed himself with a sling and a bag of stones, after he had noticed his opponent's ruse (as it happened, the sling had only recently been invented by the Aetolians); and since the sling had longer range, Degmenus fell, and the Aetolians drove out the Epeians and took possession of the land;


Perseus Encyclopedia


FIGALIA (Ancient city) ILIA

Tharyx

Of Phigalia: husband of Hagnagora, sister of Aristomenes.


HERAKLIA (Ancient city) ILIA

Ion

Son of Gargettus.


ILIA (Ancient country) GREECE

Eumantis

Eumantis, an Eleian of the house of the Iamidae, whom Cresphontes had brought to Messene. (Paus. 4.16.1)


Agorius

There also came to him an oracle from Delphi, that he should bring in as co-founder "the descendant of Pelops." Oxylus made diligent search, and in his search he discovered Agorius, son of Damasius, son of Penthilus, son of Orestes. He brought Agorius himself from Helice in Achaia, and with him a small body of Achaeans. (Paus. 5.4.3)


Iphitus

Later on Iphitus, of the line of Oxylus and contemporary with Lycurgus, who drew up the code of laws for the Lacedaemonians, arranged the games at Olympia and reestablished afresh the Olympic festival and truce, after an interruption of uncertain length. The reason for this interruption I will set forth when my narrative deals with Olympia. At this time Greece was grievously worn by internal strife and plague, and it occurred to Iphitus to ask the god at Delphi for deliverance from these evils. The story goes that the Pythian priestess ordained that Iphitus himself and the Eleans must renew the Olympic games. Iphitus also induced the Eleans to sacrifice to Heracles as to a god, whom hitherto they had looked upon as their enemy. The inscription at Olympia calls Iphitus the son of Haemon, but most of the Greeks say that his father was Praxonides and not Haemon, while the ancient records of Elis traced him to a father of the same name.(Paus. 5.4.5)


Iphitus II

Iphitus, of the line of Oxylus and contemporary with Lycurgus, who drew up the code of laws for the Lacedaemonians, arranged the games at Olympia and reestablished afresh the Olympic festival and truce, after an interruption of uncertain length. The reason for this interruption I will set forth when my narrative deals with Olympia. At this time Greece was grievously worn by internal strife and plague, and it occurred to Iphitus to ask the god at Delphi for deliverance from these evils. The story goes that the Pythian priestess ordained that Iphitus himself and the Eleans must renew the Olympic games. Iphitus also induced the Eleans to sacrifice to Heracles as to a god, whom hitherto they had looked upon as their enemy. The inscription at Olympia calls Iphitus the son of Haemon, but most of the Greeks say that his father was Praxonides and not Haemon, while the ancient records of Elis traced him to a father of the same name.(Paus. 5.4.5)


Aetolus II

Oxylus is said to have had two sons, Aetolus and Laias. Aetolus died before his parents, who buried him in a tomb which they caused to be made right in the gate leading to Olympia and the sanctuary of Zeus. That they buried him thus was due to an oracle forbidding the corpse to be laid either without the city or within it. Right down to our own day the gymnasiarch sacrifices to Aetolus as to a hero every year.(Paus. 5.4.4)


Aetolus

Aetolus. A son of Oxylus and Pieria, and brother of Laias. He died at a tender age, and his parents were enjoined by an oracle to bury him neither within nor without the town of Elis. They accordingly buried him under the gate at which the road to Olympia commenced. The gymnasiarch of Elis used to offer an annual sacrifice on his tomb as late as the time of Pausanias. (v. 4.2)


KYLLINI (Ancient city) ILIA

Phylides (= Meges)

Pulydamas stripped Otus of Cyllene, comrade of Phyleides.


Demaenetus

Founds temple of Aesculapius.


Demaenetus

Perseus Project Index. Total results on 3/4/2001: 6 for Demaenetus.


PISSA (Ancient city) ANCIENT OLYMPIA

   Alcathous, (Alkathoos). The son of Pelops and Hippodamia, who obtained as his wife Evaechme, the daughter of Megareus, by slaying the Cithaeronian lion, and succeeded his father-in-law as king of Megara. He restored the walls of Megara, which is therefore sometimes called Alcathoe by the poets. In this work he was assisted by Apollo. The stone upon which the god used to place his lyre while he was at work was believed, even in late times, to give forth a sound, when struck, similar to that of a lyre.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Myrtilos (Myrtilus)

Perseus Encyclopedia


   Myrtilus, (Murtilos). Son of Hermes, by Cleobule or Myrto. He was the charioteer of Oenomaus, whose defeat by Pelops in the race was due to his treachery. When he demanded the reward that had been settled, the half of the realm of Oenomaus, Pelops threw him into the sea near Geraestus, in Euboea, and that part of the Aegean was thence called the Myrtoan Sea. He was placed among the stars as the constellation Auriga.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Sphaerus or Cillas

Charioteer of Pelops, his tomb.


Chrysippus

Chrysippus (Chrusippos). A son of Pelops, carried off by Laius. This circumstance became a theme with many ancient writers, and hence the story assumed different shapes, according to the fancy of those who handled it. The death of Chrysippus was also related in different ways. According to the common account, he was slain by Atreus, at the instigation of his step-mother, Hippodamia.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Chrysippus

Chrysippus (Chrusippos), a son of Pelops by the nymph Axioche or by Danaiis (Plut. Parall. Hist. Gr. et Rom. 33), and accordingly a stepbrother of Alcathous, Atreus, and Thyestes. While still a boy, he was carried off by king Laius of Thebes, who instructed him in driving a chariot (Apollod. iii. 5.5). According to others, he was carried off by Theseus during the contests celebrated by Pelops (Hygin. Feb. 271); but Pelops recovered him by force of arms. His step-mother Hippodamieia hated him, and induced her solns Atreus and Thyestes to kill him; whereas, according to another tradition, Chrysippus was killed by his either Pelops himself (Paus. vi. 20.4; Hygin. Flb. 85; Schol. ad Thuc. i. 9). A second mythical Chrysippus is mentioned by Apollodorus (ii. 1.5).


Hippalcmus

Hippalcmus, (Hippalkmos), the name of two mythical personages, the one a son of Pelops and Hippodameia, and the other an Argonaut. (Schol. ad Pind. Ol. i. 144; Hygin. Fab. 14.)


VOUPRASSION (Ancient city) ILIA

Pyttius

Amarynceus, besides being a good soldier, had a father, Pyttius, of Thessalian descent, who came from Thessaly to Elis.(Paus, 5.1.11)


Heroines

EFYRA ILIAKI (Ancient city) ILIA

Epicaste

Daughter of Augeias, mother of Thestalus by Herakles: Apollod. 2.7.8


ILIA (Ancient country) GREECE

Asterodia

Others with greater probability say that Endymion took a wife Asterodia (Paus. 5.1.4)


Chromia

others say she (wife of Endymion) was Cromia, the daughter of Itonus, the son of Amphictyon; (Paus. 5.1.4)


Hyperippe

others again, (say that Endymion took a wife) Hyperippe, the daughter of Arcas (Paus. 5.1.4)


Eurycyda

Daughter of Endymion (Paus. 5.1,4)


PISSA (Ancient city) ANCIENT OLYMPIA

Hippodameia (Hippodamia)


   Hippodamia, (Hippodameia). A daughter of Oenomaus, king of Pisa, in Elis, who married Pelops, son of Tantalus.


SALMONI (Ancient city) ILIA

Sidero

Stepmother of Pelias and Neleus, attacked by them, takes refuge in a precinct of Hera, cut down by Pelias.


YRMINI (Ancient city) ILIA

Theraephone

For the sons of Actor married twin sisters, the daughters of Dexamenus who was king at Olenus; Amphimachus was born to one son and Theronice, Thalpius to her sister Theraephone and Eurytus. (Paus. 5.3.3)


Theronice

For the sons of Actor married twin sisters, the daughters of Dexamenus who was king at Olenus; Amphimachus was born to one son and Theronice (Paus. 5.3.3)


Historic figures

ARPINA (Ancient city) ANCIENT OLYMPIA

Harpina

Daughter of Asopus, beloved by Ares, mother of Oenomaus.


Harpinna, a daughter of Asopus, from whom the town of Harpina or Harpinna in Elis was believed to have derived its name. (Paus. vi. 21.6.) She became by Ares the mother of Oenomaus. (v. 22.5.)


FIGALIA (Ancient city) ILIA

Phigalus

Son of Lycaon, founds Phigalia.


Phialus

Son of Bucolion.


Phigalia

A Dryad.


ILIA (Ancient country) GREECE

Eleius

(after Aetolus) The kingdom of the Epeans fell to Eleius, the son of Eurycyda, daughter of Endymion and, believe the tale who will, of Poseidon. It was Eleius who gave the inhabitants their present name of Eleans in place of Epeans. Eleius had a son Augeas (Paus. 5.1.8)


Eleius, a son of Tantalus, from whom the country of Elis was believed to have received its name. (Steph. Byz. s. v. Elis.)


MAKISTOS (Ancient city) ILIA

Macistus

Macistus, a son of Athamas and brother of Phrixus, from whom the town of Macistus in Triphylia was believed to have derived its name. (Steph. Byz. s. v. Makistos.)


MINTHI (Mountain) ILIA

Minthe

Near Pylus, towards the east, is a mountain named after Minthe, who, according to myth, became the concubine of Hades, was trampled under foot by Core, and was transformed into garden-mint, the plant which some call Hedyosmos.


  Mintha or Minthe. A daughter of Cocytus, beloved by Hades, and metamorphosed by Demeter, or Persephone (Proserpina), into a plant called after her mintha, or mint. A hill near Pylos bore this name, and at its foot was a temple of Pluto and grove of Demeter.


THISSOA (Ancient city) ANDRITSENA

Nymph Thisoa

Nymph, nurse of Zeus.


YRMINI (Ancient city) ILIA

Hyrmina

Daughter of Epeus and Anaxiroe.


Hyrmine, (Hurmine), a daughter of Neleus, or Nycteus, or, according to others, of Epeius and Anaxiroe. She was the wife of Phorbas, and the mother of Augeas and Actor. (Schol. ad Apollon. Rhod. i. 173; Paus. v. 1.4; Eustath. ad Hom. p. 303.) The Argonaut Tiphys is likewise called a son of Phorbas and Hyrmine. (Hygin. Fab. 14.)


Kings

EFYRA ILIAKI (Ancient city) ILIA

Eleius

Eleius (Eleios), a son of Poseidon and Eurydice, the daughter of Endymion, was king of the Epeians and father of Augeas. (Paus. v. 1.6, &c.)


Amphimachus II

Polyxenus came back safe from Troy and begat a son, Amphimachus. This name I think Polyxenus gave his son because of his friendship with Amphimachus, the son of Cteatus, who died at Troy. Amphimachus begat Eleius (Paus. 5.3.4)


Eleus (Eleius) II

Amphimachus begat Eleius, and it was while Eleius was king in Elis that the assembly of the Dorian army under the sons of Aristomachus took place, with a view to returning to the Peloponnesus. (Paus. 5.3.5)


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